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Thread: Edit using stock footage

  1. Default Edit using stock footage




    Hey guys . What do you think of this short video I have tried to edit. It's about cutting in motion. I need to learn alot more but thought I would just put it on here to get some feedback. Thanks in advance

    Dan

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    Hi and welcome. I think it's great you've put up a sort pieve like this for feedback. Far better than editing a feature and being handed bac a list as long as both your arms and those of all your cast, crew and academy!

    Cutting on action is broadly OK. there are a couple of stand out "wrong" moments for me:
    0:18 The timing of the fall feelw wring. he starts to fall in the shot before (when the girl whacks him) then he seems to go back on himself and do part of the fall again. This is not helped by the fact the shots either side of the cut are from very similar angle and focal length (jump cut) and in the second shot the girl is not present - it's as if she has miraculously disappeared.
    0:23 Again two shots from almost the same angle giving us a jump cut. this time the guy in the blue teeshirt appears miraculously!

    But generally not bad. It's snappy, the shots are of varying length and it's cut on action

    After you've absorbed my comments above, your next lesson is to study the 180 degree rule or "crossing the line"

    You are probably aware of it anyway but in a nutshell the ruled is "having established a line of action, all cuts cut together should be taken from the same side of that line unless you see the line fo action change within the shot". It's simpler in practice than to describe. google it if this is new to you as numerous tutorials will explain it far better than me.

    But using your clip as an example:
    0:05 establishes the line of action as where the girl is looking - along the barrel of the gun.
    0:06 you cut o a close up of the girl - taen from the same side of the line of action. this is good.
    0:08 you cut to a similar close up of the girl from the same side but this is very similar to the shot before (only a tiny bit closer) which gives the impression of a jump cut and by the time we've blinked we're looking at the other side of "the line" - so, not actually breaking the rule, but I'd have liked half a second more of her on the first shot so the line changes more clearly in camera.
    0:10 she starts to swing back, but "the line" is on the right of the camera and we cut to a shot where it's on the left of the camera (bad). We then see the line of action change as she moves her line of sight from the left to the right - this is good.
    We the get the first serious breaking of this rule.
    At the end of the 0:11 shot the guy appears in the background (great introduction of some tension/anticipation). We see him to the right of her. Our new line of action is between the two of them. You the cut to the high angle shot, but he is on the left of her - they've swapped places. At 0:13 you cut back to the earlier position and they've swapped place again.
    Now, the 180 degree rule can be broken. IOndeed it's very often broken duuring action scenes - when you want deliberately to disorientate the viewer. however in the case just mentioned, you definitely do not want to do this as you are creating dramatic irony - you want the viewer to be aware of something that the protagonist is not aware of - so it is important to make it very clear to the viewer and so the relative positions of the protagonist and antagonist are crucial. Save the crossing the line for the action sequence immediately afterwards.

    More braodly i did like the lighting, but be careul to make it consistent. For example in the two shots either side of 0:10 much more of the girl's face and arm ale lit in the second shot.

    Hope this helps. And yes, I'm being picky, as I know that's what you want if you're looking to improve.
    Tim

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    Thanks for your feed back Tim. I'll put all this to practice and apply it to car chase scene i am currently editing.
    Dan.

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    Quote Originally Posted by daevil666 View Post
    Thanks for your feed back Tim. I'll put all this to practice and apply it to car chase scene i am currently editing.
    Dan.
    Great, I look forward to seeing it.
    Car chases are particularly interesting as sometimes you want to make it very clear what is happening (as in which car is chasing which, what landmarks they are approaching etc) in which continuity editing (in particular th 180degree rule) is important and sections where you may want to indicate the driver's disorientation where you may want deliberately to break he rule.
    Tim

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