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Thread: New Here

  1. Default New Here

    I thought I would just simply say hello

    I'm a complete beginner and never owned a video editor before. The only edit's I've done before is in photography and slide shows.

    I have and own capture one 9 and photoshop cs3.

    I would like to learn how to edit video for mainly youtube channel on woodworking. I own a div8 video camera and a pentax DSLR with video built into it also a Samsung 9.

    The software I'm using is DaVinci Resolve 16


    I am looking for a real good Tutorial with a follow along tutorial and video files to down load just to get me started.

    Anyway I'm 50 ish living in the UK with a good back ground in photography I also run a PC with a video transfer card on windows 10 I think I have the old movie maker to scan and convert the video to hard drive

    James

  2. Default

    I have been sent a PM but It's un-readable, the text looks like a code from the cold war also the forum member has been a member from October and this is his only posted post
    what would you do??

    James

  3. #3

    Default

    Hi James, welcome to the forum. Occasionally this forum gets targeted by bots and other strange spammers. The one you are referring to is most likely Vietnamese. For some strange reason we mostly attract Vietnamese spam bots. (Or maybe the forum URL is in the database of one Vietnamese bot platform?)
    Anyway back to the "What would you do". You can report posts and private messages alike by clicking the triangle icon with the exclamation mark on it at the bottom of posts/messages.
    The cats are watching us...

  4. Default

    Thank You G

  5. #5
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    Default

    Hi James, and welcome. As a moderator here, i can confirm Grapes' comments about spam and also that reported posts do get acted upon.

    I did actually sign up and pay for for a DaVinci Resolve course from Film Simplified although I was already reasonably proficient in Vegas which i was considering replacing and needed to get up to speed quickly. (There are, i'm sure, plenty of "better" Resolve tutorials available for free, but i didn't want to spend the time ploughing through dozens of YT vids to find them. It wasn't a bad course and the benefit is that I can keep going back to it (although I'm currently sticking with Vegas) and they update it free. They ofer several lessons (including a basic Resolve howto) for free so you can get an idea of what they are like. Ignore the headline prices which are just designed to make their "deals" look attractive. I think I paid about 80 for the full Resolve course plus some other bits.

    However, as I recall, it does not include sample files.

    Well worth a look are MrAlexTech's videos on his YouTube channel.

    On a more general note you don't say whether your YouTube vids are instructional or demonstrating the craft. Both would require quite different approaches to making the video.

    Instructional vids need to be clear. Take shots from consistent angles or, when changing angles in order to show something more clearly you need o look for ways of makimng it clear to the viewer where that new angle is coming from (ie ensure there are some "landmark" points of reference in th shot you're coming from and the shot you are now in. All detail work should be shown in close-up.

    If you're just after showing skilled craftsmen at work, you do not need to include every step (indeed this could become quitre tedious) and you should look at varying the shots, including some shots which aren't perhaps immediately obvious to the viewer and maybe even some tangential shots (mug of coffee beside the work area, a visiting bird seen through the window).

    What you haven't mentioned is what you are going to do for sound. It is reckoned that audio accounts for 50%-70% of what makes up a video and good sound will make your video stand out. Speaking clearly into even a cheap mic 8-12 inches from your mouth will give a far better sound than recording on your camera mic a few feet away. An investment in a good mic will last you a lifetime (as opposed to cameras which are out of date within two years)
    Do not make an instructional video with the instructions presented just as text. You will be guaranteed that 99% of viewers will click away as soon as they realise there's no voice. (It is, of course, often desirable to have certain key words or phrases appear as captions/subtitles in conjuction with a good voiceover. By all means use some music, but bear in mind if it is anything at all interesting (or, indeed too dull) this will immediately alienate part of your audience. record audio in acoustically dead an area as possible (under a duvet is not a bad place!)

    One other thing which will make your videos superior to the mass on YouTube is some decent lighting. You needn't spend a fortune, indeed you may be able to work using just windows light and cheap reflectors (which could be just white card). However, bear in mind that daylight changes with weather and time of day. Far better to have a few artificial lights on your subject. These should all match in terms of colour temperature (avoid mixing natural daylight and artificial light) and vary in brightness (which can be acheved by moving lights further away).

    As a photographer you'll already know much of this, but you won't be used to factoring the time so much, or avoiding things like shadows moving across the image.

    Good luck and keep asking the questions.
    Tim

  6. Default

    Tim
    What an wonderful post
    lighting in the workshop is all 6000k daylight white LED 600x600 mm there are 6 of these in the workshop (double garage size) plus a LED video light to sort out the shadows.
    I have bought a new mic to sit on my DSLR and also a digital voice recorder https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1 for voice over on my video's
    I have watched some of MrAlexTech's video's and I must say it's nice for some one to speak in English and with out all this hay dood stuff.

    I have some video from my Samsung Digital-can (mini DV) from my son growing up that I'm going to convert to Digital (hard drive) first
    this should get me started quite quick at editing video (fingers crossed)

    any way waiting for this to be delivered https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1 so I can start. I do also have a dvd recorder that I can record straight to DVD disc if needed.

    James

  7. #7
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    Sounds like your on the right road for an enjoyable and productive journey. It certainly sounds like you have th lighting covered.

    My only reservation is with your comment "I have bought a new mic to sit on my DSLR". There are only two reasons for mounting a mic on a camera:

    1. In a real one-man "run and gun" reporting situation (eg grabbing an opportunistic interview with the Queen when there's no-one else to hold the mic)
    2. To record audio on the camera in order to sync the video to audio recorded onto something else (ie where the "camera" audio is expected to be replaced by something recorded elsewhere).
    3 (of 2! but i just remembered one) Backup in case the main audio recording fails.

    In all other cases, the objective is to get the mic as close to the sound source as possible (this is why on-location news reporters hold their mics rather than have them mounted on the camera which is a bit further away - it also means they can direct it to reporter or interviewee without the cameraman having to pan)

    I have no experience of the device you are buying and it does seem very inexpensive. Most likey the biggest issue you will have with it is hiss from the preamps. If that's the case you may be able to improve upon it using noise reduction in (free) Audacity. My preference would be IZotope RX - and they did have a Christmas special on their Element's version for $29 which i would thoroughly recommend if you can run to that. https://www.izotope.com/en/shop/deal...=20+Days+Day+6 (Unsure if this is still available though)
    Tim

  8. Default

    Hello all
    Well today I have downloaded Davinci lessons files and ordered the book from amazon that runs with it. The book should arrive around Friday (fingers crossed) ready for a hour or two at the weekend. I have read some post's on this forum about wind being on most beginner video's.

    is there a good App/software that can split the audio file so you can remove the sound of wind ??
    James

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by James Rugby View Post
    is there a good App/software that can split the audio file so you can remove the sound of wind ??
    James
    Short answer - No.

    Don't record wind noise. If you are outside a "dead cat" is a must and if there's anything more than the very gentlest of breezes you need a zeppelin (assuming a shotgun mic). Not cheap, but a very worthwhile investment and, like a decent mic, you don't need to upgrade it ... ever!

    Izotope RX is a fantastic tool for isolating and reducing/removing elements of sound, but wind noise presents a particular combination of sounds which make it difficult to remove.
    1. A hum can be removed by very precisely homing in the frequency of the hum (and often its harmonics) and removing just those frequencies which removed everything from the audio at those frequencies (the narrower the bandwidth selected, the less noticable), Basically very precise and extreme use of EQ.

    2. Very brief transient sounds like clicks can be removed by replacing them with a generated duplicate of the sound either side of the click.

    3. A constant background sound (like hiss) can sometimes be reduced by taking a sample of just the noise and effectively subtracting it from all audio. Whilst the technology in this is pretty impressive, unless the background noise is very much quieter than the sound you want to keep, the results are not very natural sounding.

    4.Sudden bursts of sound (eg a door squeaking, a polce siren) which do not extend over a very wide frequency range can be removed by selecting just those sounds and drawing around them and either just reducing/removing or replacing with calculated sound from around the area removed. Again the success of this very much depends on the particular circumstances.

    These are the basic sound removal tools around which i believe the others are based.

    Now consider wind noise.

    1. It covers the whole spectrum - we can't home in on one or two frequencies and remove them.
    2. It is not at all transient so it is not possible to replace with the audio either side.
    3. It is not a constant background noise. No only does it cover a whole spectrum of frequencies, but the relative voulme of it at different frequencies is constantly changing.
    4. there are often some sddden low bursts of sound (where the wind directly hits the diaphram) which one might be able to remove, but in my experience these are too loud and cover too wide a range of time and frequencies to be removed without leaving the resulting audio equally, if not more, unusable.
    Tim

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by James Rugby View Post
    Hello all
    Well today I have downloaded Davinci lessons files and ordered the book from amazon that runs with it. The book should arrive around Friday (fingers crossed) ready for a hour or two at the weekend. I have read some post's on this forum about wind being on most beginner video's.

    is there a good App/software that can split the audio file so you can remove the sound of wind ??
    James

    If you imply, split the audio from the video file for further manipulation of the audio then you can always rely on Audacity. It's free (open source, not advertisement driven) and full of options. You can just drag and drop (some?) video formats straight into it and it'll just extract the audio part from the file. If it doesn't recognise it, you can also fall back on a converter and I think it's possible to extract the audio stream with VLC media player as well.
    The cats are watching us...

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