Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Premiere Pro (Captured Widescreen Footage)

  1. #1

    Default Premiere Pro (Captured Widescreen Footage)

    Hi,


    I have recently captured some footage off an old Widescreen Sony Handicam which captured in its native format but was in 720 x 576 which seems strange as this isn't WS. I didn't really notice this as when I played it back on my PC in PP it appeared in WS.


    Once I'd Exported this out of PP and played on my 55" Samsung TV however it appeared with Black Bars at the side as well as the top and bottom (4:3).

    On a different Forum someone put "It is wide screen even though the resolution is 720x576. The image is in effect squeezed horizontally when recorded and expanded back out when replayed. There will be a flag embedded in the data that tells the display device to expand it out to widescreen. It is possible that this flag is being stripped out when you export it so the TV doesn't know it is meant to be widescreen.".

    If this is true anything I've looked at on PP doesn't seem to change this. I tried "Media > Interpret Footage" after right clicking the clips in the Timeline but that didn't make a difference.


    I've tried this on another Samsung TV which plays it correctly (WS) so I'm aware the 55" TV is a part of the problem but no setting on the TV solves this problem so I was hoping someone might be aware of a solution that allows this to play on any TV if its a known issue.


    Thanks in advance for any help.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Surrey, UK
    Posts
    11,180
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Hi Steve and welcome.
    Yeah, this got me too when I started. Fortunately this was when Standard Definition was in general use and HD was for rich people whio could afford powerful enough computers etc.

    It's very easy to forget that in these days of HD, 2k, UHD, 4K and even 8K that DVDs use standard definition and in the most part the public are happy with DVDs - especially as most BluRay players will upscale to HD rather well. I produce DVDs of amateur productions/school shows for a bit of pocket money - I've never been asked for a BluRay and have only once been asked for a "digital copy" - when pressed further the end user (a parent) didn't really know what she wanted!

    The key here is that in HD and beyoud the pixels are square - the pixel aspect ratio is 1:1, which means that anyone dealing with HD or more does not have to deal with it. Those who work in Standard Definition, however have to deal with both the IMAGE aspect ratio (4:3, 16:9 etc) AND the Pixel Aspect Ratio.

    You talk about 720 x 576 which means you are in PAL land (eg UK). Neither 4:3 nor widescreen (16:9) use square pixels to create their images.
    4:3 images on Standard definition (PAL) comprise pixels which are slightly taller than they are wide, 16:9 (Widescreen) SD images comprise pixels wider than they are tall.

    Checkout Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pixel_aspect_ratio

    This does not present a problem if creating DVDs as DVD players will read the "bit" which indicates whether it's a 4:3 or 16:9 image.

    What I have ALWAYS done is to convert to Widescreen within my NLE and produced 16:9 images (with pillar box black bars if the images are 4:3). This ensures that at least the images play correctly.
    Tim

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TimStannard View Post
    Hi Steve and welcome.
    Yeah, this got me too when I started. Fortunately this was when Standard Definition was in general use and HD was for rich people whio could afford powerful enough computers etc.

    It's very easy to forget that in these days of HD, 2k, UHD, 4K and even 8K that DVDs use standard definition and in the most part the public are happy with DVDs - especially as most BluRay players will upscale to HD rather well. I produce DVDs of amateur productions/school shows for a bit of pocket money - I've never been asked for a BluRay and have only once been asked for a "digital copy" - when pressed further the end user (a parent) didn't really know what she wanted!

    The key here is that in HD and beyoud the pixels are square - the pixel aspect ratio is 1:1, which means that anyone dealing with HD or more does not have to deal with it. Those who work in Standard Definition, however have to deal with both the IMAGE aspect ratio (4:3, 16:9 etc) AND the Pixel Aspect Ratio.

    You talk about 720 x 576 which means you are in PAL land (eg UK). Neither 4:3 nor widescreen (16:9) use square pixels to create their images.
    4:3 images on Standard definition (PAL) comprise pixels which are slightly taller than they are wide, 16:9 (Widescreen) SD images comprise pixels wider than they are tall.

    Checkout Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pixel_aspect_ratio

    This does not present a problem if creating DVDs as DVD players will read the "bit" which indicates whether it's a 4:3 or 16:9 image.

    What I have ALWAYS done is to convert to Widescreen within my NLE and produced 16:9 images (with pillar box black bars if the images are 4:3). This ensures that at least the images play correctly.
    Thanks for the thorough reply. Its always nice to understand the issue I've got rather than just given a solution.

    So what settings can I change in PP to create 16:9 images as when the video plays back with black pillar bars on it the picture looks squeezed as it originally looked WS.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Surrey, UK
    Posts
    11,180
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Steveh8204 View Post
    So what settings can I change in PP to create 16:9 images as when the video plays back with black pillar bars on it the picture looks squeezed as it originally looked WS.
    Before going any further you should be aware I cannot hep specifically with Premiere Pro as I do not use it. Sorry.
    What you have not specified is how you intend to play it back.
    If it's via DVBD themn the DVD authoring software should have a DVD Widescreen setting you should use and your DVD player/TV should comply.
    If you're doing via USB stick, the jury's out. It may (or may not) work on your TV and may have different results on someone else's.

    If you're going down that route, I'd create a HD widescreev version as although Premiere might not uspscale as well as your DVD player, at least the picture won't be squashed and every device will assume it's 16:9
    Tim

Similar Threads

  1. VHS player connected to PC - all captured footage out of sync!
    By King Mustard in forum General video editing software help and advice
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-30-2011, 05:59 PM
  2. Accidentally captured WS footage in FS. Do I need to re-capture?
    By King Mustard in forum General video editing software help and advice
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-06-2009, 09:50 AM
  3. footage is being captured in slow motion
    By Cjos in forum Sony Vegas video editing apps
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 11-10-2008, 03:37 AM
  4. captured hdv footage chugs in adobe premiere and after effects
    By ben704 in forum Adobe Premiere, Premiere Elements, and After Effects
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-17-2008, 08:38 AM
  5. Video shot in widescreen but isn't widescreen when captured
    By Laughing Cheese in forum General video editing software help and advice
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-27-2007, 04:25 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •