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Thread: Whats the best camera to use for a novice videographer

  1. #1

    Talking Whats the best camera to use for a novice videographer

    Hi all!! new here - Marc

    Looking to get into a short PT videographer course if anyone can recommend?

    Also what would you say is the best DSLR cam to use to begin with?

    Would a Sony Cyber-shot be any good?

    I also have a basic sony 3d video camera ive used for side work

    appreciate any feedback

  2. #2

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    A friend of mine recommended Lumix cameras. They shoot 4k and are generally under $1000!

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by mhumphrey View Post
    Hi all!! new here - Marc

    Looking to get into a short PT videographer course if anyone can recommend?

    Also what would you say is the best DSLR cam to use to begin with?

    Would a Sony Cyber-shot be any good?

    I also have a basic sony 3d video camera ive used for side work

    appreciate any feedback
    As far as I know the Cybershot range is point and shoot only so not a DSLR at all.

    I'd actually start looking for a course first and ask them which cams they advice since they might prefer their students to have a specific brand.
    If they don't care you might get a better answer if you post a budget and a goal (what type/topic of videography are you interested in).
    The cats are watching us...

  4. #4
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    Take Grapes advice or .. if you just HAVE t get going, as you're looking to get into it, don't splash out on new stuff.
    If you've already decided you want DSLR look on ebay for anything Canon 550D onwards and a couple of lenses. This will give you plenty of scope and enough manual control as is likely to be covered in basic courses and won't break the bank.
    Tim

  5. #5

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    If you want cinematic-looking images then buy the biggest sensor you can (Canon Rebel series is a good entry point).

    If you want to learn pro videography then you need a camera that allows complete manual control. Whatever you choose make sure that’s an option.

    If you are taking a university-level class they may be specific on what camera standards they are looking for, so like Grapes says you may want to start asking there (with enough time to find a good deal or buy a used one).

    If all else fails and you just want a decent learning platform, I think this is the smallest thing that fits the bill. As I said elsewhere:
    Panasonic's software is very good for video. Here is an example under $300, the zs60 refurbished shoots 4K and can go to 120p, with a decent size sensor (1/2.3") that's larger than even the Vixia HF S20:
    http://amzn.to/2xvW6Zs

    About learning:
    If you are completely new then I’d say look at your local community college scene. You can often find non-credit classes you can take for less than $250. Although you may get what you pay for, being in a real environment with students and a teacher evaluating your work can be a great way to advance your skills quickly.

    If you already have some skills and are a self learner, I’d invest in a skillshare.com yearly membership. There’s more quantity than quality in most courses, but should be enough to help you learn a few dozen tricks and get your skills to a commercial level. I believe there’s a free 30-day trial too.

  6. #6

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    I took a different kind of approach. I bought the cheapest bridge camera (not a DSLR) I could find from a generally respected "name" brand (FujiFilm) - that could do 720p video, and discovered along the path, as I fought with some of its issues, a little bit about video. I'm still a novice of course, but it costs me very little to buy the camera, and the process of fighting with it told me exactly what I wanted in a next step or next-next-step camera. I discovered not only the issues related to the camera itself, but what *kind* of video I liked to shoot, under the conditions I was likely to shoot it. I discovered that for certain kinds of things, it's not very good, for a reason, and for some other kinds of things, it's actually pretty good, for some other reason ... I found myself wondering about this or that aspect of what was giving me grief, and then spent a lot of time on the internet trying to get my head around what the cause could be. In the process, I educated myself. That's part of the fun.


    Now looking to upgrade, and more likely to to directly to the next-next purchase because I have a better idea what I want.

  7. #7
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    Sound advice from Ronallees above. And speaking of sound advice, don't forget sound - it's at least 50% of video (and the gear you buy for that is likely to be as useful in 20 years time as it is now, so it's worth spending on)
    Tim

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    If you want to do film - buy a film camera not a DSLR

    unless you like to tinker

    in which case you are all set

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