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Thread: 16:9 Ratio

  1. Default

    Now as the Year went on with NTSC Digital 4:3 640x480 and they wanted to Broadcast a Widescreen Movie they did this.

    They use LetterBox to show the Widescreen Movie on the 4:3 TVs.

    They have Black Bars at the Top and Bottom of the Movie being Broadcast so the Movie will remain the size it was.
    This is Wider then High.

    Now it I have this right when they Broadcast the Widescreen Movie and the Black Bars at the top and Bottom everything would be Displayed 640x480.

    This is how they could show a Widescreen Movie on a 4:3 TV.

    Please tell me if I have this right?
    Thanks again for the help.

  2. #22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by biferi View Post
    Now as the Year went on with NTSC Digital 4:3 640x480 and they wanted to Broadcast a Widescreen Movie they did this.

    They use LetterBox to show the Widescreen Movie on the 4:3 TVs.

    They have Black Bars at the Top and Bottom of the Movie being Broadcast so the Movie will remain the size it was.
    This is Wider then High.

    Now it I have this right when they Broadcast the Widescreen Movie and the Black Bars at the top and Bottom everything would be Displayed 640x480.

    This is how they could show a Widescreen Movie on a 4:3 TV.

    Please tell me if I have this right?
    Thanks again for the help.
    Yep, spot on!
    The cats are watching us...

  3. Default

    So when they Broadcasted a Widescreen Movie they had the Black Bars ontop and on the bottom of the Movie.
    This would keep the Movie as is was Filmed Wider then Higher.

    And the whol image even the Black Bars would be Broadcast and Displayed 640x480 witch was 4:3 for the TVs at the time.

    Do I have this right?

  4. Default

    I am so so so very sorry I was looking for your Reply to my Widescreen Post and did not see it.
    So I put it up again.
    Now I just found the Reply you gave to my Post.

    I am not a Bot I just have very very Bad Eyes and had a hard time finding your Reply to my Widscreen Post.
    Feel Free to take the Dabble Post Down.
    Once again I am so so sorry.

    Thanks for the help?

  5. #25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by biferi View Post
    So when they Broadcasted a Widescreen Movie they had the Black Bars ontop and on the bottom of the Movie.
    This would keep the Movie as is was Filmed Wider then Higher.

    And the whol image even the Black Bars would be Broadcast and Displayed 640x480 witch was 4:3 for the TVs at the time.

    Do I have this right?
    I don't know for sure. The black bars might very well be generated by the television instead of being broadcasted.
    The cats are watching us...

  6. #26
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    Default

    Originally television was broadcast 4:3 (or "Ritter-Sport Format" as it is now called in some places).
    If the original was recorded, or filmed in 16:9 or 1:233 or any other format and it was to be broadcast then it was re-formatted into 4:3 either "letterbox" in which case black was shown at the top and bottom of the screen, or "scanned".
    This black was broadcast as part of the image.
    The other method was "pan and scan" where, to avoid the black bars selected parts of the image were chosen, meaning some of the original image was cropped out. If it was done badly you ended up with wierd compositions, or the central part of the image only was broadcast. Sometimes resulting in the sight of two noses at each edge of the screen having a conversation.

    Nerd Alert: Strictly speaking,as an analogue format, only the vertical definition, or number of "lines" was fixed. 480 lines for NTSC and 576 for PAL. The horizontal resolution varied immensely from about 300 pixels for vhs to about 720 for DigiBeta. Also because of the nature of tube televisions, the whole image tended to be cropped slightly, hence the use of "TV safe" areas marked in viewfinders and why, when old programs are shown full image on a modern screen, you sometimes see the microphone dipping into shot. On the original this was "out of cache" and wouldn't have been seen by the consumer. In fact it was common for the boom operator to have a monitor and to lower his microphone until it just appeared at the top of the screen. He could do this because studio monitors "underscanned" and knew that it would be cropped out on a consumer TV set.

    In those pre-PC days the boom operator would ask the camera operator what the montor was set to and often got the reply "A Gentle Virgin" which meant he could dip the tip of his microphone in, but not the whole thing.

    When it was broadcast, the first few lines didn't transmit picture information but technical data and, sometimes you can see this as a series of white dots and bars at the very top of the image when you watch old shows on modern sets.

    Then came 16:9 television screens.

    Nerd alert: There was a period during the transfer where shows were filmed "14:9 safe" which was a nightmare for camera operators. Essentially you composed 14:9 but you had to keep in mind that the top and bottom would be chopped off by 16:9 televisions and the sides would be chopped off by 4:3 sets. Oh what fun that was!

    Now the "norm" is to broadcast 4:3 shows with black bars on the side. Mobile phone footage filmed by brain-dead numpties in upright format has a blurred image at the sides. Widescreen is still "letterboxed".

    The SD or Standard Definition formats are (theoretically):
    4:3 PAL (European format, still used in many places) 768 x 576 pixels
    4:3 NTSC (Never Twice the Same Colour) 640 x 480
    16:9 PAL 1024 x 576 (same height as 4:3 PAL, but wider)
    16:9 NTSC 854 x 480

    Then came HD which was finally fixed as 1920 x 1080 although, for a while there were all sorts of variations such as "1440", "720" etc.

    ...and don't even start me off on frame rates and interlaced verses progressive scan, I can bore for Britain on that subject!
    Last edited by Rembrandt Rob; 11-05-2017 at 03:12 PM.

  7. Default

    Now as we know NTSC SD Digital Recording RES. is 720x480 and even my JVC Digital Camera uses this.

    Now in my Movie Studio Program I have 2. Video Formats I can use.

    Now the other Format is 720x480 NTSC and the Pixel Ratio is 0.9090:1
    so if I bring my Video into this I will be able to show it on a Standard 4:3 TV.

    Am I Right on these two things?
    Thanks.

    Now if I bring my Video in but use the 720x480 with a Pixel Ratio of 1.2121:1
    I will be able to show this on a 16:9 Widescreen TV.

  8. #28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by biferi View Post
    Now as we know NTSC SD Digital Recording RES. is 720x480 and even my JVC Digital Camera uses this.

    Now in my Movie Studio Program I have 2. Video Formats I can use.

    Now the other Format is 720x480 NTSC and the Pixel Ratio is 0.9090:1
    so if I bring my Video into this I will be able to show it on a Standard 4:3 TV.

    Am I Right on these two things?
    Thanks.

    Now if I bring my Video in but use the 720x480 with a Pixel Ratio of 1.2121:1
    I will be able to show this on a 16:9 Widescreen TV.
    Yes, it will show both on 4:3 and on widescreen. Some warping may occur which can generally be corrected in the picture settings of the television set.
    The cats are watching us...

  9. Default

    Now I know they used LetterBoxing to show Widescreen Movies on a 4:3 TV.

    Now we have Widescreen TVs so we use Standard RES. of 720x480 but with Pixel Ratio of 1.2121:1 so we have a Widescreen Video.

    But Graphic Images use More Square Pixels.
    I know they are not Square in Shape but the arange them more or less on a 1:1 Ratio giving them a Square Shape.

    So am I not right that even if I make a Widescreen Graphic 640x360 and import it into my Movie studio.
    And make a lot of them so the whole Video will be of them.

    Even if I export my whole Video as Widescreen 1.2121:1 it will not play as Widescreen?

    Because my Graphic Pixels will be off?

    Thanks.

  10. #30

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by biferi View Post
    Now I know they used LetterBoxing to show Widescreen Movies on a 4:3 TV.

    Now we have Widescreen TVs so we use Standard RES. of 720x480 but with Pixel Ratio of 1.2121:1 so we have a Widescreen Video.

    But Graphic Images use More Square Pixels.
    I know they are not Square in Shape but the arange them more or less on a 1:1 Ratio giving them a Square Shape.

    So am I not right that even if I make a Widescreen Graphic 640x360 and import it into my Movie studio.
    And make a lot of them so the whole Video will be of them.

    Even if I export my whole Video as Widescreen 1.2121:1 it will not play as Widescreen?

    Because my Graphic Pixels will be off?

    Thanks.
    Well I'm not familiar with Movie Studio to this depth but as far as I know you can import any size of images and Movie Studio will convert them so they will show perfect according to your project settings. That's how most editors work.
    The cats are watching us...

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