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Thread: Erm, that's my video!

  1. #1
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    Default Erm, that's my video!

    I found myself browsing YouTube videos today and searched using some very specific keywords. (I was trying to prove that someone could do with promoting their organisation a bit better.) I was curious to find one of my videos in the first set of results. Curious, because I don't upload videos to YouTube. At first I thought it was just that the thumbnail looked like it was from one of my videos. But, no, it was definitely mine!

    So someone had gone to the lengths of downloading it from Vimeo, and then uploading it to their YouTube account. Why on earth would anyone do this? Has it ever happened to you? Should I ask YouTube to take the video down?

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    Who's Erm?

    I am guessing that either:
    a) they uploaded it to claim that it is their own work as part of their portfolio (90% probability)
    b) they uploaded it to get adsense revenue (9% probability)
    c) they pulled a Shia LeBeoeuf (1% probability)

    An easy way to guard against this sort of thing is
    a) consistently produce crap that nobody would bother stealing (my current approach)
    b) add sexually explicit subtitles in a foreign language (I'm considering this approach for the future)

    I'm not sure what to suggest - I could contact vimeo and tell them that MB's "life of snails" video was stolen from me - I'm not sure why they would believe me - other than telling me about the benefits of "autofocus" I don't think they'd do a whole lot - the best bet may be to think of this person as a maniacal and very likely psychotic fan of your work

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    That's a tricky one, Marc. I found myself having several contradictory reactions within the first few seconds of reading your post. (Mainly anger/pride on behalf of you)

    What to do - a concerted comment campaign on the YT video (and channel?) in an attempt to discredit the owner (assuming comments are allowed)?
    Complain to YT?
    Complain to the channel owner? (Not even sure that's possible)
    Thank the owner?

    Had they added any comments to the video?
    Tim

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    Personally I would complain to youtube. It happens a lot and needs to be stamped on. It's your work, you own the copyright and you deserve to be the one who gets any kudos, praise or ad revenue (wishful thinking but it's about making a point).

    At the very least I would put a direct, blunt comment on the video.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rembrandt Rob View Post
    At the very least I would put a direct, blunt comment on the video.
    If you don't mind the video on YT benefiting from more hits, this could be co-ordinated so a number of us post comments at the same time (before he has a chance to take comments off). And place comments referencing the theft on his other videos as well.
    Tim

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    Happened to me once. Found someone had downloaded video of mine and reuploaded it on their own channel. By the looks of the other content in his channel it seemed he was just downloading and reuploading other peoples creations. Never found out whether it was for money or some other reason, but I contacted the channel owner and told him to take down the video or I would be contacting Youtube. He agreed to take it down I let the matter be.

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    That's probably the best approach

    Although unlikely, this person may have gotten the video from somebody else and doesn't even know it is a copyright violation

    Last edited by zamiotana; 01-28-2015 at 12:57 PM.

  8. #8
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    I submitted a copyright violation report with YouTube. The clincher for me was that he/she had removed my logo at the end of the video.

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    I can go one better...

    "Camcorder User" magazine used to run a video competition called "Gone in 60 seconds". I was on the final jury after the dross had been eliminated in the first round.

    One potential finalist was footage of a cycle race cut to music. One of the rules was that you had to have shot all the footage yourself. We would have allowed a bit of leeway but it was mainly to stop people using professional images and music.

    You can imagine my surprise as, watching this entry, every now and again I recognised stuff I'd shot, which had been re-framed from 4:3 (it was a few years ago) to 16:9 which made some of the compositions a bit strange but he'd had to do it to lose the "Eurosports" logo!

    Small world eh.

    But in this case, removing your logo from the end is really extracting the urine.
    Last edited by Rembrandt Rob; 01-28-2015 at 02:30 PM.

  10. #10
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    That tops it all

    Maybe it's just me, but i don't get the point of copying someone else's work - was the first prize in your contest so great that it was worth cheating? Really?

    Why not just put your own work out there? Sure it might be "dross", but it's yours.

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