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Thread: what are busses

  1. Default what are busses

    what are video and audio busses exactly?I tried to google it but cant find a youtube tutorial on it

    edit:I am using sony vegas pro

  2. #2

    Default

    Busses go back to the days of physical mixing desks.

    Think of a 'bus' as a 'virtual track' that has one or more other tracks (real or virtual) mixed together in order to form this virtual one.

    A bus is a path that a signal takes from one place to another, where multiple signals can be combined / mixed and then treated in the same way, e.g. adding an effect to it, perhaps an audio limiter is applied, or maybe a compressor etc, but it's not effects just one track, it's effected all the tracks that have been sent to that bus.

    As an example, take a couple of different audio channels (tracks), each one can be treated independently, but if they are sent to a 'bus' then the bus can have an effect applied together, at the same time, then return that effected audio back in to the mix, usually on the final mixdown (stereo or 5.1) output, but it could also be routed to another bus for further processing.

    In computer terms, it's a case of taking the digital data, combining them in to a new signal (virtual track), applying your effects then mixing the new signal instead of (or perhaps in addition to) the original tracks.

  3. Default

    ah thank you now at least I understand what it is I can figure out how to work with them

  4. Default

    Examples of buses:

    Main or master bus: where the signals are combined into the main (or master) mix. This can be a stereo pair, a 3-channel LCR mix, a 6-channel 5.1 mix etc.

    Submix group bus (sub, group, submix etc.): where signals are combined to be processed as a group before reaching the main bus or to be routed to an alternate destination (i.e. multitrack recorder).

    Auxiliary bus (aux, send etc.): where signals are combined to be sent to a parallel effect like a reverb or for an alternate mix (i.e.front fills). Aux sends are almost always post-fader.

    Monitor bus: where signals are combined for stage monitors or IEMs or for an alternate mix (i.e. live 2-track recording). Monitor sends are almost always pre-fader though they can be pre- or post-eq, pre- or post-insert etc.

    Matrix bus: where signals from other buses (master, subgroup etc.) can be combined for various purposes such as recording mixes, fills, remote systems etc.
    Last edited by bouldersoundguy; 07-04-2014 at 06:10 PM.

  5. #5

    Default

    Generally speaking, a buss is a signal path. Usually when a mixer manufacturer says their mixer is a 4 bus, or 8 buss, they are referring to the number of subgroups. As it traverses the console, it picks up signals from any channels that are routed to that buss, just like the road bus picks up passengers.

  6. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stpelerer View Post
    Generally speaking, a buss is a signal path. Usually when a mixer manufacturer says their mixer is a 4 bus, or 8 buss, they are referring to the number of subgroups. As it traverses the console, it picks up signals from any channels that are routed to that buss, just like the road bus picks up passengers.
    Right, and audio buses and road buses have the same root, omnibus, which is why it's spelled with one "s". "Buss" is a brand of electrical fuse, though the plural of bus can have one or two of the letter "s".

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