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Thread: Adobe Premiere Export Gliches

  1. Default Adobe Premiere Export Gliches




    I exported a video from Premiere with the Adobe Encoder and 5 mins in, it goes pixelated.

    So I exported to QT file and then converted to mp4 using Handbrake. This time the image was super crisp but when there was movement, there were lots of narrow horizontal lines - see attached image.

    Please can somebody advise me how to export the movies from Premiere without glitches. My expertise is yoga and not editing!

    Thank you so much.

    Abi

  2. #2

    Default

    I don't seen any attached image :(

    What bit rate are you using when encoding? what size is the video (SD, 720p / 1080p etc) ?

    Have you tried deleting all render files and making Premiere Pro encode on export?

    Have you applied any effects?

    Are you resizing the video on export / encode?

    Does the QT file exhibit the problem? If not then it's in the encoding that we need to look further.

  3. Default

    Hi David,

    Thank you so much for your response.

    Screen Shot 2014-06-06 at 13.31.30.jpg

    To clarify, first I exported a 15 minute video using the Adobe Encoder with the following settings:
    H.264, 1280 x 720, 23.976, CBR, 0.4

    It's HD 1080.

    I thought everything was fine but the video started to pixelate when there was a radical switch in image (switched camera angle).

    I then tried exporting the file as a QT file, Apple ProRes 422. Then I switched to Handbrake and set the average bitrate to 583 to get the file size I am after - which is 80MB. I selected 2-pass encoding and turbo first pass. Which is kind of incidental because the glitches appeared when I exported to QT.

    There are a couple of video effects - brightness, white balance, sharpness...

    Please can you explain your point about rendering. I have not rendered the files before exporting. I thought that would add an extra hour or so and I am exporting 100 videos. Not that I care about time - only about quality.

    One final point, even though the QT file shows glitches as soon as I move, the quality was infinitely better than when I encoded through Adobe.

    Thank you again for your help.

    Abi

  4. #4

    Default

    Wait. You're exporting 1080p. You want to maintain 1080p. You're exporting to a constant bit rate of 0.4 and you're wondering why it's not awesome?

    YouTube and Vimeo both recommend a bit rate of 5.0 and you're at less than 10% of that. If you want a small file you're going to have to reduce the resolution as well.

    Oh, and chances are you'd be better off with a 2 pass VBR than a CBR since VBR will save the bit rate when it's not needed leaving it more flexibility when there is more movement, or change of camera angles.

  5. Default

    I'm sorry - I don't understand. The glitch occurs when I export to QT with Codec Apple ProRes 422. I don't alter the bit rate at this point. The default setting is 24 bit depth.

    Should I try another Codec when exporting to QT?

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by abicarver View Post
    Hi David,

    Thank you so much for your response.

    Screen Shot 2014-06-06 at 13.31.30.jpg

    To clarify, first I exported a 15 minute video using the Adobe Encoder with the following settings:
    H.264, 1280 x 720, 23.976, CBR, 0.4

    It's HD 1080.

    I thought everything was fine but the video started to pixelate when there was a radical switch in image (switched camera angle).

    I then tried exporting the file as a QT file, Apple ProRes 422. Then I switched to Handbrake and set the average bitrate to 583 to get the file size I am after - which is 80MB. I selected 2-pass encoding and turbo first pass. Which is kind of incidental because the glitches appeared when I exported to QT.

    There are a couple of video effects - brightness, white balance, sharpness...

    Please can you explain your point about rendering. I have not rendered the files before exporting. I thought that would add an extra hour or so and I am exporting 100 videos. Not that I care about time - only about quality.

    One final point, even though the QT file shows glitches as soon as I move, the quality was infinitely better than when I encoded through Adobe.

    Thank you again for your help.

    Abi
    woah!! 80mb??? You are sabotaging your own film - a 15 minute video with average compression will be closer to 1gb - but you could maybe squeeze it into 200 mb using every trick in the book - 80 mb will only get you crap

  7. Default

    It is for an iPhone app so the files cannot be any bigger.

    I have just repeated the process exporting to QT codec PNG, then compressed to 80MB in Handbrake and the video is flawless. However the process took 4 hours and I have 100 videos to export!

    Which codec could I select which creates a file that is between PNG and Apple ProRes quality?

  8. #8

    Default

    Firstly, just so we're all on the same page I assume you know that QT is a container, just like MP4 and not the codec itself. The codec you need for iPhone is H264 which can then be wrapped in a QT or MP4 container.

    80MB appears to be a self imposed 'file size limit' rather than a specific data rate requirement is that correct? If your videos were longer you'd need an even lower data rate due to file size requirements and if they were shorter you could give it more bits? How long are your videos?

    iPhone 5 native resolution is 1136x640, so do you really need it to be 1920x1080 rather than (say) 1280x720. By giving it any more than this you could be wasting a LOT of space (bit rate) for no reason, since the iPhone still needs to resize your video down to this on playback. If you're heading for iPhone then 1280x720 may be a better solution (unless you want to go 1136x640!) and should give you smaller files. Try it and see if you can actually see enough difference on an iPhone to make you want the higher resolution. Note that resizing will likely increase your encode time. There is no such thing as a free lunch here :(

    I would avoid CBR unless speed of encoding is your only priority and use a 2 pass VBR for smallest file with highest quality. Eve 1 pass VBR is likely to be better. CBR dedicates the same bit rate to every frame, whether it needs it or not. This is hugely wasteful on frames with very little movement and often not enough for frames with more movement. VBR uses less bandwidth when it's not needed and more when it's needed (more movement) while still averaging out overall. Give it an average setting equal to your CBR setting and allow the max to be maybe 20% higher. If you let it make 2 passes then you can sometimes get even smaller files with higher quality. However, for screens as small as iPhone most people aren't going to notice the quality difference most of the time unless you're on a really low bitrate.

    In terms of codec choices h264 (or x264) really is the only option you should be considering for iPhone. It has the very best quality encoding for the file size and the iPhone has hardware decoding built in, whereas other codecs are either unsupported or take too much CPU time (and drain the battery). If you can't get good quality from h264 then the chances of getting anything even close on any other codec at the same low bit rate is pretty much non existent. h265 will help in the future but it's not currently an option.

    Handbrake can give excellent results, but as you're finding out it's also not the fastest tool in the box. You don't say if you're on a Mac or Windows, but since you're encoding to ProRes I'm going to assume Mac for a moment. Adobe's H263 encoder is acceptable for most things, but not great. Do you have Apple's Compressor? You can use it's built in iPhone settings and optionally can also get a (free) X264 plugin for it. I've found it does perfectly well and goes faster than Handbrake, so that's what I use most of the time. I tend to use Handbrake only where every other encoders have had problems, and even then Handbrake is not guaranteed to fix it (most times it doesn't).

    Lastly, if you really want the best (fastest) encoding time then do it on an i7 Ivy Bridge or Haswell CPU since these are even better optimised for H264 encoding. My i7 totally trashes my 8 core Xeon for H264 encoding, but the 8 core is faster for ProRes.
    Last edited by David Partington; 06-08-2014 at 12:16 PM.

  9. Default

    Premiere
    Format: Quicktime
    Preset: HD 720p 24, H.264, AAC 48kHz
    Video Codec: H.264
    Quality: 90
    1280 x 720
    686.7MB


    Handbrake
    Variable Framerate
    Average Bitrate: 583
    2-pass encoding
    Turbo first pass
    80.2MB

    These are the settings I am considering...

  10. #10

    Default

    Realise that a bit rate of 583 is nowhere near a quality of 90, so that's where the majority of the file size difference is coming from.

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