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Thread: Sick of DSLR limitations, want a vid cam

  1. #1
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    Default Sick of DSLR limitations, want a vid cam

    I used to have a Panasonic 3mos about £800 until a lowlife stole it, will be claiming off the insurance.

    I was very happy with it for gigs with a Rhode microphone, however I will be able to add to that when the claim comes through.

    I shoot sports, hill climbs, and GIGS most of all, and would like some advice on a better setup please. EG JVC GY-HM150E (GYHM150, GY HM150) High Definition Camcorder

    Am considering £1.5k approx., but am confused as many "Pro" gear appears to state

    "
    Total pixels per sensor 2.37 megapixels
    "

    As in the case of the Canon XF300

    Am I missing something, 2.37MP, my toy Panasonic has 12MP, and the new Panasonic has
    Total Pixels 38.28 megapixels (12.76 megapixels x 3 )

    http://www.trustedreviews.com/panaso...mcorder_review


    Thank you

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigmanjoe View Post
    I know you would rather have a camcorder but this will let you do just about every thing a camcorder does but has a larger sensor and interchangeable lenses. You also cannot beat the price for what it can do. Video resolution up to 4096x2160 (4k).

    http://shop.panasonic.com/shop/model/DMC-GH4KBODY
    No it does not hence wanting another video camera

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by JR1 View Post
    "
    Total pixels per sensor 2.37 megapixels
    "

    As in the case of the Canon XF300

    Am I missing something, 2.37MP, my toy Panasonic has 12MP, and the new Panasonic has
    Total Pixels 38.28 megapixels (12.76 megapixels x 3 )

    http://www.trustedreviews.com/panaso...mcorder_review


    Thank you

    OK - I see why you're confused. You're assuming more megapixels is better, but that's not always the case.

    If you take 1920x1080 and convert that in to megapixels you're looking at 2MP (give or take a few pixels). Now, if that is a single sensor design then when that's de-bayered (the method of getting the RGB from the photosites) you aren't quite getting full resolution 1080p because some of the pixels are being synthesised from the data.

    Take a product like the XF300 though, and it actually has tree sensors at 1920x1080, one for each of the R, G & B, so you get a much higher final resolution than a single sensor design. Of course the single sensors are cheaper to produce.

    The cameras that are quoting higher MP are doing this differently. They are shooting at (say) 12MP, debayering the RGB and the downscaling to 1920x1080 in camera. This is, in theory, a better solution but has some major drawbacks. If the downscaling is not done well (as is the case of many cameras) then you end up with aliasing (stair stepping along straight lines) and moiré (the weird patterns that come from bad down scaling).

    The C100 that I shoot with most has a 4K sensor but downscales to 1080p in camera, producing extremely sharp / details pictures compared to any DSLR or single sensor camera I've personally had experience with. As a single 4K sensor it's on par (actually better IMO) than the three sensor 1920x1080 XF300, but with much better low light performance too.

    The first question you need to ask yourself is how important is low light vs ultimate resolution. Are people complaining about the DSLR resolution (which is typically not full 1080p) or is it that you just don't like the DSLR ergonomics and working (if so I share your concerns).

    There are lots of video cameras that offer great low light performance from Sony, Panasonic and Canon, though your price point sits smack between the high end consumer end and the low end professional gear and there's not much around in that price range.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Partington View Post
    OK - I see why you're confused. You're assuming more megapixels is better, but that's not always the case.

    If you take 1920x1080 and convert that in to megapixels you're looking at 2MP (give or take a few pixels). Now, if that is a single sensor design then when that's de-bayered (the method of getting the RGB from the photosites) you aren't quite getting full resolution 1080p because some of the pixels are being synthesised from the data.

    Take a product like the XF300 though, and it actually has tree sensors at 1920x1080, one for each of the R, G & B, so you get a much higher final resolution than a single sensor design. Of course the single sensors are cheaper to produce.

    The cameras that are quoting higher MP are doing this differently. They are shooting at (say) 12MP, debayering the RGB and the downscaling to 1920x1080 in camera. This is, in theory, a better solution but has some major drawbacks. If the downscaling is not done well (as is the case of many cameras) then you end up with aliasing (stair stepping along straight lines) and moiré (the weird patterns that come from bad down scaling).

    The C100 that I shoot with most has a 4K sensor but downscales to 1080p in camera, producing extremely sharp / details pictures compared to any DSLR or single sensor camera I've personally had experience with. As a single 4K sensor it's on par (actually better IMO) than the three sensor 1920x1080 XF300, but with much better low light performance too.

    The first question you need to ask yourself is how important is low light vs ultimate resolution. Are people complaining about the DSLR resolution (which is typically not full 1080p) or is it that you just don't like the DSLR ergonomics and working (if so I share your concerns).

    There are lots of video cameras that offer great low light performance from Sony, Panasonic and Canon, though your price point sits smack between the high end consumer end and the low end professional gear and there's not much around in that price range.
    First problem is I often set the camera to record constantly, up to three hours, which no DSLR can do, so I need a Vid cam, also I shoot as you can see...........................

    https://www.facebook.com/JRSPhotography.co.uk

    Indoors and under various conditions.

    I am looking for a quality camera for this.

    Thanks

  5. #5
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    That JVC gets a good review from Philip Bloom. Other options are Canon G30 (or XA20 - same camera with XLRs and infra red). It seems people are disappointed with the Panny X920 - I have a friend who bought one to replace his broken SD900 - build quality appears to have gone down. Another possibility is the new Sony CX900, but this only has one SD slot (The G30 has two giving you very log recording if required). More professional is the Canon XF100 new at £1571 at CVP. Hard to come by at much lower 2nd hand (I've waited 18 months but finally got one at under 1K)
    Tim

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by TimStannard View Post
    More professional is the Canon XF100 new at £1571 at CVP. Hard to come by at much lower 2nd hand (I've waited 18 months but finally got one at under 1K)
    Really annoying that I paid £2,500 for my three XF100s when they were new, but I guess that's the price of progress and new models! It just make it hard to justify selling them to upgrade when they are so good at what they do.

  7. #7
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    The canon has huge pixels that soak up light like nobody's business - compare the low-light specs with comparable cameras - since the pixels are so astronomically huge they take up a lot of space so if they made it 18mp like their DSLRs the back of the camera would be thirty feet across and the unit would be water-cooled

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