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Thread: Serious camera for video streaming filmed indoors

  1. #1
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    Smile Serious camera for video streaming filmed indoors

    We are trying to built a video-system for streaming worship services over the Internet. After digging some more on the Internet we narrowed it down to these three options:
    - Sony HVR-HD1000U, entry-level professional camcorder with HD capability
    - Panasonic HC-X920, remarkable sensor specifications (1/2.3" 3 backlit sensors, min. lux performance)
    - Canon Legria HF G25 / Cannon Vixia HF G20, top of the line in online reviews, smaller sensor than Panasonic's


    We are looking for a primary camera that would be filming from the back - 40-50m away from the scene - in low/difficult light setup.


    Giving the tasks at hand what would you pick?

  2. #2

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    I've used the Legria range quite a bit...great little units.

    How are you streaming the content?

  3. #3
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    Default Streaming

    We're uploading to a streaming server with:
    - a Blackmagic ATEM TVS video-mixer

    - a Blackmagic IntensityPro capture card
    - an i7 Dell Optiplex with 8 GB of RAM and Windows 7 x64
    - two Cannon Legria HF R48 camcorders that will be filming at short distance without zoom

    All we need is a good main camera far back to capture most of the footage 40-50m away.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bpotter908 View Post
    I've used the Legria range quite a bit...great little units.

    How are you streaming the content?

  4. #4
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    Default

    I also have a Legria but not the G25 which is a later (and presumably better) version. Bought it a couple of years ago to go on holiday with and love it. The image quality is surprisingly good, including in low-light situations.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Hi OP, what's the Budget? . . . your camera-list and Upload facilities rather points to some serious money . . . so I guess you are planning for a large audience?
    What is the light-level? (( Whilst many cameras claim low-light performance they are most far better than a few years ago - but for full colour you still need more . . . the more the better, so that is probably the easiest way to get better quality))
    By using lighting (is this filmed in an old church?), then you can also help focus the audience on the person speaking, as it will reduce distraction. The lights can be switched On/Off as the service progresses - indeed planning the lighting may be as important as planning the audio (-Is this not another issue?).
    Do you plan to use a single camera?

    Are people viewing this over the internet, i.e. probably on small screens, with limited Audio?

    Will the material be edited? This certainly makes things a lot easier and could help with an audience using other languages, the deaf, etc.

    Hope that helps
    Last edited by vidmanners; 08-10-2013 at 12:53 AM.

  6. #6
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    - Panasonic HC-X920, remarkable sensor specifications (1/2.3" 3 backlit sensors, min. lux performance)

    I read that, was surprised and checked up on it. Don't get too exited. It appears that the larger sensor is used for the image stabilisation - a much smaller portion actually captures teh active image.
    As you are no doub aware, a larger sensor gives you (a) a better chance of getting a smaller depth of field (probably not relevant in your situation) and (b) better low light performance. Panasonics own publicity does not claim (a) which, I'm sure it would, if it was relevant and it claims (b) is down to the Back Side Illumination.

    Don't get me wrong, it's a very impressive camera, but specs can be misleading.

    The Canon G20/25 should become available as a bargain as the G30 (would you like the 20x zoom?) becomes readily available.
    Tim

  7. #7
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    Arrow Picture Quality

    Thank you for the interesting insights for choosing this camera. We're using a 3 camera setup with 2 Canon Legria HF R48 filming up front (no zoom - best image quality these camcorders can offer) and one main camera 40-50m further back from the scene. The material will be streaming live over the internet and edited/uploaded to YouTube after the services.

    The third camera must be more capable than the first two - it will be filming with zoom almost all the time, in a combination of cold and warm lights (please see the attached picture with the actual setup), and will also be used to produce the main picture for live streaming. The budget for this camera is 1200$ or 1000 Euro. Another interesting camera for this budget is the JVC GC-PX100B beside the Canon G25 and Panasonic HC-X920.

    Question is, which camera could produce the best picture quality in these conditions?
    Betel_Panorama.JPG
    Last edited by Mircea Enache; 08-10-2013 at 08:16 PM.

  8. #8
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    Thumbs up Update: Final decision

    After much debate and testing the Canon G25/Panasonic X920 we came to the conclusion that we need at least 15x optical zoom to get a decent picture quality in our setup.

    Searching back and forth we took into consideration new cameras: Sony HDR-FX7, PMW150, HVR-Z1from which the FX7 seems the most appealing - 20x optical zoom, decent performance in artificial light, easier to use.

    Do you have any experience/opinion on the FX7 that we can take into consideration before buying it?

    Quote Originally Posted by TimStannard View Post
    - Panasonic HC-X920, remarkable sensor specifications (1/2.3" 3 backlit sensors, min. lux performance)

    I read that, was surprised and checked up on it. Don't get too exited. It appears that the larger sensor is used for the image stabilisation - a much smaller portion actually captures teh active image.
    As you are no doub aware, a larger sensor gives you (a) a better chance of getting a smaller depth of field (probably not relevant in your situation) and (b) better low light performance. Panasonics own publicity does not claim (a) which, I'm sure it would, if it was relevant and it claims (b) is down to the Back Side Illumination.

    Don't get me wrong, it's a very impressive camera, but specs can be misleading.

    The Canon G20/25 should become available as a bargain as the G30 (would you like the 20x zoom?) becomes readily available.

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