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Thread: Tips on increasing low audio on a track

  1. #1

    Default Tips on increasing low audio on a track

    Tips on increasing low audio on a track
    .
    1 – Right click on the audio and and then >> SWITCHES >>NORMILIZE. That will bring the audio up to the loudest part of the audio, if it does not seem to do anything, look for the biggest audio peak and trim the audio until you can no longer see it and try again. This will make the loudest bit of the audio very loud or distort, so use the rubber banding to bring
    down again.
    .


    2 – Use the rubber banding to increase (or decrease) the audio, highlight the track header on the right (where the faders are), it should turn blue. Press V (for volume) and a blue line will appear (pressing P will bring a PAN line which is red). You double click on the line to make nodes and then push the line up or drag it down, normally four nodes are needed to raise a increase/decrease the volume on a section. The quick way to do it is to drag the cursor in the area that has the TIMECODE on the left and you will get a highlighted section in BLUE, the grab the line and push up or drag down to adjust levels.
    .
    3 – At the track header, where the Volume and Pan sliders are, click on the TRACK FX (normally green). On the TRACK COMPRESSOR tab, from the PRESET drop down box, try the “[Sys} 3:1 compression starting at-15dB" to help boost the audio. Also try clicking on the Green Icon (top right) "PLUG IN CHAIN" and the select the "Wave Hammer Surround" and click OK. (or you can double click to add). on the drop down box, select "[Sys] Voice”. This boosts the voices really well, try the sliders to adjust to taste.
    .




    .
    Do bear in mind increasing the audio to much will result in louder background noises and hiss (you can try the noise reduction plugin to help with this a certain amount), also use the “Track EQ” to adjust the tonal qualities of the audio.

    Update Tutorial as requested

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  2. #2

    Default

    Is the initial Normalisation necessary? Cannot the Compressor's gain controls be used?

  3. #3

    Default

    Yes and no, depends on how low the sound is to start with, if it is low then it helps, otherwise the compressor can work overtime, trying to bring it all up.

    You need to listen to the level of the audio and what the meters are saying to help make that decsion.

  4. #4
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    I'm lost at the rubber banding stage - what the heck is rubber banding?

    I right click on the audio, and open in external editor (Wavelab for me), and then use normalise and loudness settings, then when I save the file it updates the sound file in Vegas instantly.

    Do you think Vegas is that good? Or is using an external audio editor better?

  5. #5

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    Rubber banding is a way of manipulating the audio (or video) levels, either to lower a section of audio (or raise) while someone speaks or remove a click.

    The things that you have done in wavelab can be done within Vegas, remember Vegas was an Audio editing program when it started life back in the late 90's. Which is better depends on how well you know your software

    Rubber Banding in action.

    Rubber Banding 1.jpg

  6. #6
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    Thanks, yes I know wavelab, but not audio in vegas, so it's faster for me, and it's less screen clutter doing it separate.

    That rubber banding looks like a graphical representation of some sort of compression to me.

    I wish I understood audio manipulation better, wavelab 6 has a million things, I understand about 10 of them lol

  7. #7

    Default

    Oh no,
    "That rubber banding looks like a graphical representation of some sort of compression to me"

    That statement is false, it is more of turning the volume knob up and down, one could say level control

  8. #8
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    Ok, I like the way that Vegas leaves this manipulable, so you can tweak it later as desired for the final cut. That would be an advantage over using an external editor.

    Do I assume we ignore the peaks below the middle line? These are unheard?

  9. #9

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    The peaks below the middle line are heard, but they are at the new reduced level, vegas does not reduce the waveform to show what is happening.

    if you want to see the audio reduced on a whole clip, grab the top of the audio clip (mouse changes to an hand with a finger pointing up) and pull down, this will show the waveform getting smaller and reducing the final output of that clip.

    have a read of this and see if it helps you.
    Basic Definitions of Digital Audio - Sony Vegas Portal

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stripe View Post
    Ok, I like the way that Vegas leaves this manipulable, so you can tweak it later as desired for the final cut. That would be an advantage over using an external editor.
    Indeed
    The "rubber banding" to which Cheema refers (Vegas calls the envelopes, "rubber banding" sort of refers to the way in which we're using them here) is available for pan and mute as well so they can all be changed right up to the final mix.

    But that's only part of it. Many, many, if not MOST of the parameters for all the audio FX are also "automatable" and you can assign envelopes to them in and use them in much the same way - so you could have a parametric eq with a boost at 100Hz on frame 1, which you steadily change to a boost at 400Hz by frame 500, hold it there until frame 1000 then gradually change to 100Hz by frame 1500. Then, if you decide it's wrong (or delete 100 frames between 500 & 600, you can easily change where the changes occur in the audio. All non-destructive!

    Vegas is therefore ideally suited as an audio mixer.

    Wavelab appears to be more like Sound Forge - best suited for pre processing individual audio files.

    For example, I use SoundForge to perform the initial tidying up of the audio that was recorded with the video - most likely this will only be a bit of noise reduction and normalizing, but I'd do this to the whole take so it is consistent. Then back in Vegas I'll do any trimming etc. Finally I'd do the mix in Vegas (where I will also deal with compression, reverb and eq) - I may just export certain bits for special FX as well.

    In other words I tend to see SoundForge (or Wavelab) as a tool for dealing with (improving or enchancing) a individual sounds and Vegas as a tool for combining all the sounds.
    Tim

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