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Thread: Newb Sound+multiple video question....

  1. #1

    Default Newb Sound+multiple video question....

    First: Let me say I am a newb to editing and camera work. In fact I have a guy that will be doing 99% of the work and I will be taking his advise into consideration. However he has limited experience and will have a learning curve along with me in our endeavors.Second: Our goal is to record high quality(mostly indoors with studio lighting) video.
    However we have a extremely tight budget.
    We plan on recording with 2 HD camcorders. Because of our budget we had a thought to buy a couple camcorders in the 500-600 USD range and also buy a separate sound recorder with a decent mic and rig it like a boom microphone. Then use the old slating techniques to sync the sound to the two video recordings. Or use PluralEyes to sync sound. The only issue I have with this is I was planning on installing Ubuntu along with some Linux video editing software to lower costs. But I can just sync sound then move the file over to the Linux computer.
    My questions are multiple fold.
    First is this viable for a quality, online, production? Sound wise and video wise.
    What kind of format for sound should we be looking to record in if we have AVCHD format or AVI camcorders.


    Does anybody have an setup/equipment recommendations including mics/camcorders/studio gear that you can offer for this kind of set up?


    I would like to thank you in advance. And apologize for such a long post
    THANK YOU!

  2. #2
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    Your list of kit reads like you know it . . .but with so many things, it's not what you do, rather "how" you do it. For convenience stick with audio recorded on the camera, even if this means a boom mic (out of shot). Mac software is "probably" easier to use, but Windows is less than half the cost. Ubuntu is unlikely to be anything like as easy, but with much knowledge it may be possible....In general the cost of a decent PC + software will be less than the software for a Mac, but maybe you already have a powerful modern computer? SDHC portable recorders are useful, but most camcorders in yr price range should have mic-input (and headphone op, please!). Most kit is available inbudget range . . . but it depends on what you want to do . . . 2-camera shooting suggests something rather complicated . . . can you give an example of what you propose. The snag with 2-cameras is they can get in each-other's way; unless you have a very big studio, roof hung lights etc. . . . . . .Have you thought of joining a local Film-Making club to learn the craft? This should be done before buying kit or software.
    Last edited by vidmanners; 05-25-2013 at 09:59 PM.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by vidmanners View Post
    2-camera shooting suggests something rather complicated . . . can you give an example of what you propose. The snag with 2-cameras is they can get in each-other's way; unless you have a very big studio, roof hung lights etc. . . . . . .Have you thought of joining a local Film-Making club to learn the craft? This should be done before buying kit or software.
    It may read like I know what I am saying, but that is just because I have spent the last several days researching video recording and editing. I actually know nothing of the field. I am also just choosing the best of what I can determine is good for what we need. However I came here for more professional advise/guidance. For examples of what I mean for shooting purposes:
    Imagine two cameras at the 45 degree angle from the subject, one for close ups and one for a longer range to include full sitting body and some back ground for interview purposes. The main reason for this would be to cover A LOT of questions all of which can be edited into multiple videos later on without any obvious camera breaks just by incorporating the two camera positioning during the editing so that the missing/altered questions are never noticed. So that each of the later videos have plenty of "filler" and a variety of questions but each appear smooth and mostly independent of the other series of questions.
    Another example: Imagine a pub/bar scene with two cameras shooting to add some interest to the scene so it does NOT look like a boring interview but an interaction.
    As for studio lights, we have conquered that with a very cool DIY 3 point hanging light system made of pvc, inexpensive reflectors and florescent lamps from a hardware store.
    Your tip about joining a local Film-making club is really awesome and I hope helpful. I am going to look into local clubs as soon as I am done with this post. Thank you vidmanners.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vidmanners View Post
    but most camcorders in yr price range should have mic-input (and headphone op, please!).
    One or two maybe. You'd be hard pushed to find any at that price with headphone out. I know. I tried. eg Panasonic V720 at $549 on Amazon.com has mic in but no headphone.
    You may of course prove me wrong, but where were you when I aksed this question a few month back when purchasing on behalf od a school!

    Syncing to an extenral recorder is a dioddle (you have to sysnc two cameras anyway). Just make sure once "Record" is pressed on each device you don't stop/pause as every stop is a re-sync. This way you will not be limiting your choice of camcorder and, if you upgrade your camcorder later, you will still have a handy digital recorder.
    Tim

  5. #5

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    dioddle
    That means easy to do. I'd recommend a Zoom H2 or better a Zoom H4n digital recorder, if the budget stretches that far.

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    A Digital recorder is always useful, I use a now-discontinued make for foley as well. However, experienced posters haven't commented on yr proposal of two cameras each at 45 deg to subject - It is my understanding that your close-up won't match . . the viewer sees the subject from the other side. Can you conform this is right? As to suitable cameras, it depends on what you need in quality stakes, shallow Depth of Field is the aim of broadcasters as it help the subject stand-out, but with care the effect can be achieved with "budget" camcorders . . . but it's not so easy due to the wretched sharpening effect in the camera. You should look at the Sony cx410 - which is below yr budget and does have mic-in and headphone out - but at this price you don't get the pro-features, but it will work either auto or manual so you can adjust mic-levels. The image-stabalising is very good, although for studio shots you can ignore it, . . other than maybe the rare traveling shot (eg as a contestant walks into the set). It's not perfect in low-light according to the Spec, but mine works fine outdoor at night eg where shops are lit, in the (lit) road junctions, etc......and in yr studio I suspect you have more than enough lighting. However, beware of flat lighting from fluorscents - you do need some modelling and light on the hair from a spot can help the subject stand-out from whatever background you use (keep it plain and dull). I suspect, but don't know, that you might be well served to start with ONE camcorder and discover any snags. If you have access to a DSLR this can be used for (movie)close-ups which you can put in at the Edit, however the stab won't match the CX410 despite its low price. . . . . Video clubs vary - you may need to drive a few miles, to find one that's up yr street, as it were . . . Good Luck.
    Last edited by vidmanners; 05-28-2013 at 12:39 PM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by vidmanners View Post
    A Digital recorder is always useful, I use a now-discontinued make for foley as well. However, experienced posters haven't commented on yr proposal of two cameras each at 45 deg to subject - It is my understanding that your close-up won't match . . the viewer sees the subject from the other side. Can you conform this is right?
    this all depends on whether the interviewer is in the shot or not.
    If you are shooting subject only (interviewee) then really you want the interviewee to be looking at the interviewer who is standing right next to the camera (eyes at camera height). The closer they are to the camera, the more intimate/direct the interview. Start moving the interviewer (ie the interviewee's line of site) away from te camera and the interview becomes less subjectve and more objective. This can also be useful.
    Many modern interviews will have the basic "interviewee looking just to the left or right of the camera" and intercut shots from as far away as profile. This is all very trendy and MTV and if that's what you want, go for it. For a more direct interview mix shots mid and close up shots with the interviewee looking just to the (say) left of the camera. For your variety, use cutawauys of their hands or other features, extreme close ups of eyes and lips, perhaps.
    With a single subject vidmanners is correct. There is a "line" between the subject and the camera. Jumping from one side of that to the other is not a natural move (if we were in the scene observing, we could not magically jumpr from one side of that line to the other). However, with a neutral shot (straight ahead or a cutaway) in between this is acceptable. Of course, this is only a guideline and jumping across the line is also acceptable if you are doing this for a specific effect.

    If the interviewer is in shot then the scene changes. Two cameras at 45 degrees will work just fine. Anything yp to 180 degurees is fine as the "line" is between the eyes of teh inetrviewer and interviewee. Simply avoid crossing that line.
    Tim

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