Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Avoiding disaster?

  1. Default Avoiding disaster?

    Hello all,

    I am new to this forum and looking to get into wedding videography. I am assuming that keeping a backup camera and backup memory cards on hand is a given, but what can you do to avoid disaster if your camera is not writing properly to the card or something is otherwise going wrong *while shooting video* and you're unaware of it until too late?

    Are any of the following possible ways to avoid this disaster, and if so which, if any, do you use? Can you give some insight of how much a just-starting-out videographer would need to budget for such safeguards? (I have not yet purchased a camera for this use.)
    a) second videographer
    b) camcorders (reasonably priced) that accept two cards that can record simultaneously in case one card fails? (which makes/models?)
    c) a camcorder with available on-the-fly video upload to a cloud drive while recording (this is getting a bit out there, but I don't know what's available)
    d) cameras that have good "self-awareness" of potential problems and ways to alert the videographer (which makes/models?)
    d)something I'm missing?

    I know it would be an epic disaster to record a whole wedding video and then later realize that your project did not record properly or there was a problem with the memory card and you are left with zilch for your clients. I'm sure this happens, although hopefully not often. If y'all can discuss what you do to avoid this, or if it doesn't happen enough for you to personally worry about, it would be of great help.

    Thank you!

  2. #2

    Default

    Just buy plenty of good memory cards. Don't try and find cheap deals on non brand names. Keep an eye on them, back them up when they're done recording and format them regularly.
    If your just starting out then partner with someone who's been doing it a while as their second camera op and learn the lay of the land first hand. There's more than just cards not backing up that can go wrong, a lot of logistical planning, contracts and people to deal with, more techy stuff like sound and lighting, what clients expect of you and what locations allow you to do etc etc
    if you've done other filming work some of that will be second nature, if you haven't done any then find that partner or offer to do some friends 'behind the scenes' wedding vids with less commitment involved and learn your lessons there.

  3. #3

    Default

    Good advice from Fuzzy, I've only ever had one equipment failure during a shoot and that was on an old tape base camera. I didn't know at the time about mixing Sony tapes and Panasonic. They use different lubricants on the tapes and can cause the tape head to grunge up which is what happened. Luckily it was only a fixed third camera so I got around it. The best thing to do as Fuzzy says is not worry too much about this sort of thing. I would have check list and make sure you go through it the night before a shoot. This would include charging batteries and testing equipment. Have a spare camera in case of failure of your main camera. Something that will get you through the day should something happen like a brides maid knocks the camera over or what ever.

    There are cameras that you can record to an external device and the cameras internal memory cards at the same time which is something of a safeguard so this may be an idea for you.

    I'm not a full time pro and I don't do weddings but I do have some experience but you're best bet is to do what Fuzzy says and find a local wedding guy (pick one that knows what he's doing) and pick his brains.

    Equipment failure these days seems to be less likely especially with good quality equipment that is looked after but having a spare is a great idea.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Surrey, UK
    Posts
    10,851
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Midnight Blue View Post
    I'm not a full time pro and I don't do weddings but I do have some experience but you're best bet is to do what Fuzzy says and find a local wedding guy (pick one that knows what he's doing) and pick his brains.
    This is an oft quoted suggestion and I can't think of a better way of learning how to do it, but would a local guy want to train up someone who's potentially going to be his rival, even if he will work for peanuts?
    Tim

  5. #5

    Default

    That's the one weakness in the plan but if there is enough business to go around then it shouldn't be an issue.

  6. #6

    Default

    Hi Danny. Welcome to the wonderful world of wedding coverage. Unlike commercial shoots where a reshoot is often possible, a wedding isn't. One day, one chance.
    I film (old fashioned me) on tape with a back up hard drive (firestore).
    Prior to the firestore I've only ever had one tape failure and there was no indication in the viewfinder at all that anything was amiss. The gut wrenching feeling when it came to capture is hard to describe . . . Apart from a few brief seconds, there was nothing at all on the main cam tape of the ceremony apart from sparkles. I even sent it to the BBC machine room to see if anything was salvageble - Zilch! Apparently the tape had twisted on loading and stayed that way until it was changed.
    Having a 2nd cam on the job saved the day, but all the creative shots were on my tape, so it was still a bummer explaining to the bride's Father the missing shots. A few extra DVDs and extra special editing did help smooth the way and he did book us for his other daughters wedding so a huge sigh of relief.

    Anyway . . If I was using cams (always use a min 2 at weddings) with CF cards only for capture, I'd do as others have suggested and buy the best brands with the most reliable reviews you can find, I'd also invest in something similar to this Atomos Portable Recorders Ninja 2 | TapeOnline.com
    Card only capture is still in its infancy and till it's proven ultra rock solid, back up is always wise. I'd also take a laptop to the event and download to that too. Misplacing cards/tapes is always gonna be a risky business and can/will happen at least once in your career. Best of luck!
    My opinions are just that . . . Mine. It's not personal, but is based on my emotional and professional reaction to requested critique. If you choose to ignore constructive comments, I'll just assume you're a vanity poster and not posting to improve your filming and editing skills.

    Ex A.P.V Videomaker of the year - Ex M.M. IOV Come join my EXclusive club

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TimStannard View Post
    This is an oft quoted suggestion and I can't think of a better way of learning how to do it, but would a local guy want to train up someone who's potentially going to be his rival, even if he will work for peanuts?
    Ive got a number of self shooting pds, dops etc in my line of video work, all based pretty much next door. Rather than see them as rivals though I see useful and trustworthy professionals I can pass work onto should I not be available and get the same in return. We also hire kit off each other every now and then and look to each other as second ops or assistants when we have something that requires more cameras.

    Training someone up to work to the same ethics, quality of work and be reliable can be a massive piece of mind when a client is desperate for some filming and your already booked, to be able to recommend someone you know will do the job properly is great. Usually, for me, that person will return the favor on work their unavailble for, maybe not straight away but it usually comes back.

    the wedding business is very cut throat, but it really is all about state of mind. Any videographer who sees the others as rivals is only essentially making the job harder for themselves in the long run.
    Its just finding someone with the right mindset.

  8. #8

    Default

    I agree that having a spare op or team to cover events is good business practise, I have a couple of teams that I swap work with and we help each other out both with kit, advice and coverage.
    I have over the years employed camera ops to cover weddings for us too, but never again.
    Inevitably, instead of covering them in the requested style we need, they try to either impress us with 'their cam style' which isn't what a client has booked us for, or poach potential clients by distributing their own business cards.
    I had one op who approached us 'cause he just liked filming and wouldn't dream of covering weddings' who not only copied his cam tapes to use as a showreel (after being refused permission due to client confidentiality) but also persistently requested to see our completed productions 'just out of curiosity' - but then set up his own 'wedding video business'. . . Luckily I had him sussed from day one - My name is cupid not stupid!!

    Yes, weddings are a cut throat business and there's no way on earth I can be persuaded to give our hard earned reputation, style and tricks away to any passing wanabee just because I may need a bag carrier for free.
    My opinions are just that . . . Mine. It's not personal, but is based on my emotional and professional reaction to requested critique. If you choose to ignore constructive comments, I'll just assume you're a vanity poster and not posting to improve your filming and editing skills.

    Ex A.P.V Videomaker of the year - Ex M.M. IOV Come join my EXclusive club

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Zero View Post
    I agree that having a spare op or team to cover events is good business practise, I have a couple of teams that I swap work with and we help each other out both with kit, advice and coverage.
    I have over the years employed camera ops to cover weddings for us too, but never again.
    Inevitably, instead of covering them in the requested style we need, they try to either impress us with 'their cam style' which isn't what a client has booked us for, or poach potential clients by distributing their own business cards.
    I had one op who approached us 'cause he just liked filming and wouldn't dream of covering weddings' who not only copied his cam tapes to use as a showreel (after being refused permission due to client confidentiality) but also persistently requested to see our completed productions 'just out of curiosity' - but then set up his own 'wedding video business'. . . Luckily I had him sussed from day one - My name is cupid not stupid!!

    Yes, weddings are a cut throat business and there's no way on earth I can be persuaded to give our hard earned reputation, style and tricks away to any passing wanabee just because I may need a bag carrier for free.

    Sounds like you've experienced some shitty people Zero.
    Having those extra teams to cover work, lend advice etc... good business practice as we have both mentioned.

    I'd just like to make it clear though - I don't believe in asking anyone to work for free on a paid job, especially not to carry stuff around for my benefit. I wouldn't want anyone to think thats what I am implying.
    Apols if it came across that way :p

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 09-06-2011, 09:53 AM
  2. Avoiding the red screen
    By BritishEye in forum Pinnacle Studio, Edition including Avid Xpress and Liquid
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-23-2007, 06:35 PM
  3. Avoiding a Grainy Appearance???
    By jawinn in forum Pinnacle Studio, Edition including Avid Xpress and Liquid
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-27-2006, 05:48 PM
  4. re-editing a dvd: avoiding over compression problems?
    By asinshesq in forum General video editing software help and advice
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-06-2006, 09:34 PM
  5. DISASTER has occured to my XM2
    By camera_james in forum Hardware Problems
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-06-2005, 02:57 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •