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Thread: proffesional editing system ?

  1. #1
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    Default proffesional editing system ?

    Anybody any experience with DELL desktop pcís for video editing? I just invested in a new one scince I had to drop my old pc from the 5th floor to get some speed from it. See below for system specs. I know the video card is a bit over the top for video editing but since I enjoy a good video game now and then I decided to invest extra so Iím settled for a few years at least. An external firewire capture disk is on the list and Iím ready to take off. I also have a dualboot system were win2000 is dedicated to video editing only. Now my pc wasnít exactly cheap, eventhough DELL is cheaper then the local pc builder, but if I compare it to some proffesional video edting systems the price is sometimes 8 times higher! Are they so much better to justify the price difference? I paid 1300 euro while on creativevideo.co.uk I saw a system at over 11000 euro. (Over 7000 pound) I guess the last one is much faster but does it do more? Is it more stable then an ordinary DELL? I mean, do you need such an expensive system to create great looking films?
    Dell 8400, Pentium 3.2, 800Fsb, 2mb cache 1024mb, DDR2 400
    74Gb raptor
    256mb ati radeon x850xt platinium
    Dualboot Winx2000Sp4, WinXpHome
    Adobe premiere pro, encore dvd
    Sony Vx2000

  2. #2
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    Default

    We use a lot of Dell PCs where I work (the university of manchester, who are officially the best customer of Dell PCs in the UK higher education sector) and they seem to be a lot more reliable than other brands we have, a far lower % of faulty PCs. If I had any suggestions, for that, I'd add an extra hard drive.

  3. #3
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    you will produce nice enough stuff with your system spec, but yes there is a lot better and therefore a lot more expensive.

    For example I have a matrox real time editing card in mine, these are about 1,000 pounds and it makes all the difference when using premiere.
    These more expensive systems you mention probably have stuff like this in along with dual processors, 2-4 gig of ram and probably 3 HDD. And yes when you pay 7,000 they will be more reliable because they will be built with high end reliable branded parts.
    Probably not worth the money, but you get what you pay for. A lambo car spec maybe only 50% better than a RX8 just for example but then the price is 20 times more.
    2 x 21\" HITACHI super contrast monitors.....2 x 200 gig HDD\'s....2 x 512mb dane-elec pc3200.....TV in card (cheap and sh!t!)....3.2 P4 HT....BOARD - ASUS P4C800 - C delux (fsb 800mhz DUAL DDR 400)....GRAPHICS - ATI 256ddr POWERCOLOUR Radeon 9600XT (500mhz/400mhz)....MATROX RT.X100 real time editing card

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Digital Dan View Post
    Anybody any experience with DELL desktop PCís for video editing? I just invested in a new one since I had to drop my old PC from the 5th floor to get some speed from it. See below for system specs. I know the video card is a bit over the top for video editing but since I enjoy a good video game now and then I decided to invest extra so Iím settled for a few years at least. An external fire-wire capture disk is on the list and Iím ready to take off. I also have a dual-boot system were win2000 is dedicated to video editing only. Now my PC wasnít exactly cheap, even though DELL is cheaper then the local PC builder, but if I compare it to some professional video editing systems the price is sometimes 8 times higher! Are they so much better to justify the price difference? I paid 1300 euro while on creativevideo.co.uk I saw a system at over 11000 euro. (Over 7000 pound) I guess the last one is much faster but does it do more? Is it more stable then an ordinary DELL? I mean, do you need such an expensive system to create great looking films?
    No..

    All computers sold today can edit Digital video..

    Q/. So why are Video editing capable computers more expensive?

    A/. Its because in Video editing systems, Reputable Computer Assemblers are suppose to install the fastest available CPUs with the maximum of Memory..

    And all this does is simply speed up the processing of ones videos..

    If one is only editing standard definition, a single core CPU home computer will do the job just as good as the most expensive computer with that multi-core CPU just released only yesterday!

    Of course if one is to work with High Definition, and one doesn't want to wait around twiddling ones thumbs for hours and hours, as sections of various video clips are processed, then yeah that extra cost for speed and memory is well worth the investment, all is not lost if you just bought your computer, as any one can easily upgrade it, so that -

    No waiting is experienced!
    And as an added bonus the projects video proofing with the fastest CPU and maximum memory plays smooth as, and whats more in full screen mode - and at maximum resolution.. which I am sure most would agree is much better than proofing a video at a 1/4 screen with a low resolution to the edited video..

    If any one is interested, I may write an article as to how one can upgrade ones computer to a very capable Video editor..

    Cheers all,

    Pete.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by laidback View Post
    If any one is interested, I may write an article as to how one can upgrade ones computer to a very capable Video editor..
    OK Pete, I challenge you.

    In my experience any "upgrade" that is worthwhile involves a new CPU which will be a new generation and consequently a new motherboard and most likely new RAM. Oh, and the bus will have changed so most likely you'll need a new video card. Possibly PSU as well.

    And as the system is over two years old you probably don't want to trust those moving parts and anyway newer hard disks are more efficient in terms of power consumption, capacity and retrieval times.

    You could probably see where this was headed when I started.

    OK I accept there are tinkeres who who might meddle every few months for incremental performance increases, but for most of us building from scratch every two to three years where you can REALLY see the difference is the sensible way to go.

    My "challenge" was tongue in cheek, but I'd be interested in your thoughts.
    Tim

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    Quote Originally Posted by TimStannard View Post
    OK Pete, I challenge you.

    In my experience any "upgrade" that is worthwhile involves a new CPU which will be a new generation and consequently a new motherboard and most likely new RAM. Oh, and the bus will have changed so most likely you'll need a new video card. Possibly PSU as well.

    And as the system is over two years old you probably don't want to trust those moving parts and anyway newer hard disks are more efficient in terms of power consumption, capacity and retrieval times.

    You could probably see where this was headed when I started.

    OK I accept there are tinkeres who who might meddle every few months for incremental performance increases, but for most of us building from scratch every two to three years where you can REALLY see the difference is the sensible way to go.

    My "challenge" was tongue in cheek, but I'd be interested in your thoughts.
    LOL - Indeed,
    But, Here in Australia,
    "One" can purchase upgrade kits which includes a Motherboard, A CPU that is appropriate to ones Pocket and the motherboard of choice, and with it - Memory that is also to ones Pocket.

    These kits can be as cheap as $300 dollars for a dual core - right up to whatever ones limit, and or if one wishes to go over the top.

    Here in my area, any of the computer dealers will install the lot into your box for around $100 or one of theirs for around $50 Bucks if you buy all the bits from them including the box with PSU, so even if one updates to a base line Dual core system its gonna cost around $400 bucks that's if one needs to rely on the dealer, but if one is confident in their ability to read and interpret installation instructions and able to install Windows on their own, then with that extra $100 bucks in ones pocket a base line Quad core might just be viable, a base line quad core should do the trick, as I find my dual core that I upgraded around a year ago does OK with all my HD videos..

    Granted - Sometimes I have to wait a little bit with my dual core, but I am not that far away from changing it to a Quad as my mother board was purchased appropriately for this upgrade in mind, I spent an extra $10 bucks on my motherboard just for this to be possible..

    There is one thing I must stress and that is - An upgrade may not be possible if one has a computer that is NOT generic, I repeat - if one wants to upgrade ones computer, it must be a generic one, so how can we tell if we have a superior Generic computer? Simple!

    If you don't have a copy of your OS at hand, mind you not one of those Restoration and or recovery Disks that you get with a well known brand, then what you have is an inferior and almost redundant system and your only option would be to wait for Windows 7 to be released and or if you simply cant wait a few months, you buy a generic box and whatever the current Windows that is available.

    Most computer cases here in Oz, cost anything from $55 to around $500 dollars that is if you're after a multimedia Box & remote with one of those LCD touch screens up front, but for our purposes {video Editing} all we need is an average box with good cooling and an appropriate Power supply.

    With such a box containing a NEW Dual core CPU, fitted to a New mother board utilizing Dual channel Memory - It can be got here for around $450 to $500 bucks dependent on how much memory one wants, which is around half the cost of a base line complete new system.

    Windows Vista and or when Windows 7 is released here in Oz, it could cost around $200 Bucks or more on top of an upgrade! Making ones upgrade an expensive lesson on the pitfalls of owning a well known branded computer..

    As for the graphics and or graphics card, I recommend a motherboard with on board graphics is just fine, unless one is into gaming as well, to which I would then be considering a motherboard that would accommodate all your graphic cards err~ surely you are going to crossfire and or SLI them!!!???? and or is there some new system even more spiffy~er just released?

    Eh!

    BTW - I am with you, I cant wait for the hard drives to go all solid state..
    mwah~ha~ha~ha~ha <eep>

    Cheers to all readers..

    Pete..
    May the Universe return a hundred
    fold what you charge unto others

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by laidback View Post
    "One" can purchase upgrade kits which includes a Motherboard, A CPU that is appropriate to ones Pocket and the motherboard of choice, and with it - Memory that is also to ones Pocket.

    These kits can be as cheap as $300 dollars for a dual core - right up to whatever ones limit, and or if one wishes to go over the top.
    ...which, in my mind is a new computer. But with "old" moving parts

    Like you I tend to spend a few quid more on a motherboard (more for stability than upgrade potential but often the latter comes as part of the former). But look at the dillemma:

    I could replace my Core 2 Duo with a Core 2 Quad 6600 but there are two things against this:

    The Q6600 seems to be going for 60-75% the cost of an i720, which sort of makes it seem foolish not to bite the bullet go the whole way.

    More importantly, going to 4 core means a reinstall of Windows. Even starting with an XP with Service Pack 3 slipstreamed disk, that's many hours downloading all the patches. Then, reinstalling the software on top of that we're looking at maybe a couple of days down-time (and a few weeks before everything is tweaked back to how I like it).

    Don't get me wrong. I'm itching to suffer that inconvenience but I'll do it all in one hit - when Windows 7 is released and I also take the plunge to go 64bit.
    Tim

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    I wouldn't recommend that kind of upgrade (motherboard, CPU and RAM) without advising that a complete re-install of Windows (and therefore all of your software) will be necessary. This kind of upgrade is only recommended for self builders. Once again, I would stress that changing your motherboard will require a fresh installation of Windows.

    With PCs at their lowest price (it's hard to find expensive PCs these days), the self build option is becoming less attractive. In fact, in my opinion, it's always been the best of breed option for those that wantto pickand chose the best components. Don't get me wrong, I've built serveral PCs over the years, and appreciate that the advantages. But with branded PCs so low in price, upgrading the guts of a PC has a marginal edge over buying a branded PC from the likes of Dell.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Peters View Post
    I wouldn't recommend that kind of upgrade (motherboard, CPU and RAM) without advising that a complete re-install of Windows (and therefore all of your software) will be necessary.
    And often a complete reinstall of Windows gives a massive performance boost anyway
    I agree, Marc, about cost and would go so far as to say that not since the mid 1990s has self build been a cheaper alternative. Especially when one factors in one's own time.
    The only advantage of self build since then has been the ability to pick & mix components.
    Tim

  10. #10
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    Default What Windows? 32 or 64? upgrade AMD-Pentium?

    Quote Originally Posted by TimStannard View Post
    ...which, in my mind is a new computer. But with "old" moving parts
    <LOL> Agreed..

    Also what with the current trend, ?! at least here in Australia - I already made up my mind, after the quad core upgrade which I will do when Windows 7 is released, and then later around late 2010~mid 2011, I will simply have the dealer assemble a NEW box with the choice of eh~he New moving bits or should I say hopefully Non moving bits, "what with Solid state memory getting cheaper by the month a hard drive should be cheaper if its a solid state one ?!" Err~Granted perhaps a somewhat smaller in capacity one, but importantly it would be a blindingly fast Drive, and importantly without any moving parts to it -

    Once I get the new box, I am hoping all I need to do is copy everything outside of the windows folder from the old systems Drive to the new boxes Drive and then fire up {Programs and settings transfer} and then transfer from the old Box everything to my new box, I already tried Windows 7's system transfer module and for me it was a breeze and worked without any foreseeable hiccups, mind you a family member who's computer is based on a Pentium had an unheard amount of problems mainly with drivers and has ended up being extremely Irate at me, because for some reason nothing worked and they were forced to start a fresh, luckily most that was lost was rubbish anyway, and with the new rediscovered nippiness with all that rubbish gone from the system were soon soothed "mind you that was build 7000", since - I have tinkered with that first version and lately the "RC" that's the "Release candidate" and with both 64 bit and 32 bit, and it all looks good to go to a 64 bit, so yeah~finally I may have a single boot system with just a pure 64 bit environment...

    Like you I tend to spend a few quid more on a motherboard (more for stability than upgrade potential but often the latter comes as part of the former). But look at the dilemma:

    I could replace my Core 2 Duo with a Core 2 Quad 6600 but there are two things against this:

    The Q6600 seems to be going for 60-75% the cost of an i720, which sort of makes it seem foolish not to bite the bullet go the whole way.

    More importantly, going to 4 core means a reinstall of Windows. Even starting with an XP with Service Pack 3 slip-streamed disk, that's many hours downloading all the patches. Then, reinstalling the software on top of that we're looking at maybe a couple of days down-time (and a few weeks before everything is tweaked back to how I like it).
    Before I upgrade I always fire up my computer into safe mode, also if one wants, one can also first do a Backup of the old system, anyway - I then un-install all drivers and once all drivers are un-installed, and note this is critical - once all drivers are un-installed and should Windows be restarted, on booting up - it looks at the hardware to see if any changes have been made, if changes are evident, it then seeks from its data base for the appropriate basic drivers, but if much the same hardware is still installed it will re-install all the last known drivers that provided a stable boot.. For this reason once all drivers are un-installed within safe mode, I pull the plug and or remove all power, and then I upgrade the hardware.

    Doing it that way - so far I haven't had too many problems, which may also have been ignorant Luck, because I have stuck to much the same genre as in AMD or Pentium Chip-sets when upgrading, although I did have limited success with earlier systems going from Pentium to AMD, and in that order only as in from a Pentium to an AMD..

    Over the past I have built and upgraded many systems both Pentium and AMD for family and their friends, and needless to say, I have only one family member who is constantly in touch with me with computer woes, so what can I say? each to their own, I don't mind either to be honest..

    I Must admit, I feel I have been blessed with real time experience knowing that AMD is quicker for the dollar, "that's quicker for the dollar" and let me just say - If I was in the computer business to make money, I would highly recommend Pentium, but as I am not in it to make money, I would recommend the fastest for ones dollar is the only way to go!

    My only wish is that the family member who is still a Pentium Fan, would take a lesson from the rest of the families bliss, why would a on board network and or its driver give so much trouble with the on-board sound and graphics?

    I must stress the above was my experience and I am but merely an amateur, and for all I know I may be better at putting together AMD systems rather than Pentium Systems, although my first Pentium was a Pentium 100 built by a dealer that gave me no end of grief, followed by a 200 MMX Pentium system that I put together myself, sadly with around much the same grief, which in reality and hind sight, I feel was mainly the fault of the available OS flaws rather than the hardware itself, and I feel this still may be the case with respects to Pentiums Woes..

    Anyway going way back, I once - With much hesitation as I was an adamant Pentium supporter - built from the ground up, an AMD Duron 700 MHz, over a Pentium III that would have been with a slower clock speed which at the time would have cost me around the same..

    To this day, I still have - Well I should say my wife still uses this system for her volunteer work and general Internet surfing, granted I had no end of trouble getting a basic windows Vista installed onto that sucker, due to Vista's insistence for higher system specs, but that's about the only woes that this system gave me.. So how did I get Vista installed on to it?

    I Ended up borrowing some memory and a faster CPU..

    Anyway, Since that first system - I always preferred AMD, and every one has been astounded that their system cost them around half as much as Pentium and when compared to the Pentiums performed just as well or in some cases better, and this included systems put together for Gamers, which even blew a Gamers brand new Pentium to kingdom come, mind you the system I built has a Crossfire arrangement "two Video cards sharing the load"..
    Don't get me wrong. I'm itching to suffer that inconvenience but I'll do it all in one hit - when Windows 7 is released and I also take the plunge to go 64bit.
    Indeed - 64 bit is the way to go..

    BTW - If it really does take so long "couple of days" these days to get a Pentium based system running properly again via an upgrade, I Guess it would be safer to wait a few more years before I give a Pentium Box another go, as I find even for the day it takes to setup an AMD system upgrade - it is far to much of an inconvenience to me..

    So yeah an AMD system may be the way to go for a bit longer, at least until Pentium sorts out their problematic drivers.. which leads me to a question I have to all other readers on the off chance things may have improved over the last 6~9 months..

    Q/. Who else has been blessed with the experience of both CPUs? and what are your thoughts on which CPU is less problematic and or is with the better real processing power for the money that one forks out for them?

    Cheers,

    Pete..
    May the Universe return a hundred
    fold what you charge unto others

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