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Thread: complete beginner, new camera.

  1. #1

    Default complete beginner, new camera.

    Hi

    I have been using my JVC everio for a few years for the usual family holiday films. This is just basic stuff point and download, without the editing.

    I am in the process of setting up a new business and will need a camera that is a bit more professional. Ease of use, good quality picture and sound are important as well as build quality as it will( hopefully) get alot of use. The camera will be used mainly inside.

    Price will also be a factor in this tough times.

    Ideas please.
    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
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    Default

    You haven't indicated what sort of business or how frequently or how you will be using the camera in your business.
    Tim

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by TimStannard View Post
    You haven't indicated what sort of business or how frequently or how you will be using the camera in your business.

    Hi Tim

    it will be upto five times a week for interviewing clients.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gdess59 View Post
    Hi Tim

    it will be upto five times a week for interviewing clients.

    OK Thanks.

    What will you be doing with the footage? Sorry if my questions sound dumb, but you could be doing anything from just keeping the footage for your own records through to using it to advertise your company through to the clients paying you for this footage.

    Will interviews be indoors - in a studio environment, your office environment, their offices/factories or outside. Are you looking for just head and shoulder/upper body shots. Will they be prepared to re-take and re-take? Or would two cameras be better (an interview rapidly becomes boring is all we see is one angle of someone talking)

    Most importantly you need to consider sound. No camera has good sound. Good sound on a camera means at best that it will capture an ambient sound that you can use in the mix. Apart from that it is used for syncing with the main soundtrack, which, in the case of an intervew is best captured using a handheld mic (if you don't mind it being in shot or if the cropping is so tight you can't see it), a boom mic (which will require someone else to operate it or a lavalier (tie clip). For a basic interview, wired is fine - why add the complexities and added risk of interference and cost of going wireless? Your choice of mic could be connected direct to the camera (if the camera has a mic input - many don't) or to a separate digital recorder (like the Zoom H1, H2 or H4n) so you can sync in post.

    I can't stress enough how important the sound is - especially for interviews. The message is what is important. It must be clear. If the listener struggles to hear you will loose his attention. Furthermore dodgy bits of video can be covered up with cutaways, if there's a glitch in the sound during a line which cannot be cut, there's always going to be a glitch there.

    Who is going to edit this? You've said your experience does not include editing. Do you have a package in mind? Have you set aside time to learn it? (basic editing is not at all difficult, but as with camerawork, it's worth learning a few conventions)

    Then ther's the issue of lighting. I'm not saying you have to buy lights. You just need to consider how to make best use of available light. There's plenty of advice on the net, some good, some bad. The thing is to experiment and work out how best to light your sbject now, rather than at the time when the client rolls up and is ready to speak,

    I would also recommend joining a video/camcorder club. If you're in the UK, look on www.theiac.org.uk for lists of clubs in your area. These are mostly frequented by old men. But old men who are more active than many old men, who have a lot of experience and are more than willing to offer practical advice - they might even lend you some kit or allow you to play with some to get a better idea of what you might need.

    Please note I'm not trying to put you off. If you want to get into creating your own more professional videos it is incredibly rewarding. I'm just trying to point you in the direction of avoiding some of the pitfalls that we've all made.


    And I realise I haven't answered your question!
    Tim

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TimStannard View Post
    OK Thanks.

    What will you be doing with the footage? Sorry if my questions sound dumb, but you could be doing anything from just keeping the footage for your own records through to using it to advertise your company through to the clients paying you for this footage.

    Will interviews be indoors - in a studio environment, your office environment, their offices/factories or outside. Are you looking for just head and shoulder/upper body shots. Will they be prepared to re-take and re-take? Or would two cameras be better (an interview rapidly becomes boring is all we see is one angle of someone talking)

    Most importantly you need to consider sound. No camera has good sound. Good sound on a camera means at best that it will capture an ambient sound that you can use in the mix. Apart from that it is used for syncing with the main soundtrack, which, in the case of an intervew is best captured using a handheld mic (if you don't mind it being in shot or if the cropping is so tight you can't see it), a boom mic (which will require someone else to operate it or a lavalier (tie clip). For a basic interview, wired is fine - why add the complexities and added risk of interference and cost of going wireless? Your choice of mic could be connected direct to the camera (if the camera has a mic input - many don't) or to a separate digital recorder (like the Zoom H1, H2 or H4n) so you can sync in post.

    I can't stress enough how important the sound is - especially for interviews. The message is what is important. It must be clear. If the listener struggles to hear you will loose his attention. Furthermore dodgy bits of video can be covered up with cutaways, if there's a glitch in the sound during a line which cannot be cut, there's always going to be a glitch there.

    Who is going to edit this? You've said your experience does not include editing. Do you have a package in mind? Have you set aside time to learn it? (basic editing is not at all difficult, but as with camerawork, it's worth learning a few conventions)

    Then ther's the issue of lighting. I'm not saying you have to buy lights. You just need to consider how to make best use of available light. There's plenty of advice on the net, some good, some bad. The thing is to experiment and work out how best to light your sbject now, rather than at the time when the client rolls up and is ready to speak,

    I would also recommend joining a video/camcorder club. If you're in the UK, look on www.theiac.org.uk for lists of clubs in your area. These are mostly frequented by old men. But old men who are more active than many old men, who have a lot of experience and are more than willing to offer practical advice - they might even lend you some kit or allow you to play with some to get a better idea of what you might need.

    Please note I'm not trying to put you off. If you want to get into creating your own more professional videos it is incredibly rewarding. I'm just trying to point you in the direction of avoiding some of the pitfalls that we've all made.


    And I realise I haven't answered your question!
    Hi Tim

    thanks for your detailed reply. The footage is to be sold to the client. it will be a head and shoulder shot only. Filming will be at the clients property. You are right sound quality will be important.

    In regards to editing I am considering, if the business is successful, putting the work out to a pro.

    regards

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by gdess59 View Post
    it will be a head and shoulder shot only. Filming will be at the clients property.
    In that case it's probably worth considering a DSLR. They take longer to set up, but it sounds like it'll be a "one location" shot, and with the right lens and lighting conditions you should be able to get good separatiion between the subject and the background. definitely out of my area now so i'll let others talk you through that.
    Personally i'd go for something that's a bit more of an all rounder - partly because i'm not a confident cameraman and partly so i could use the camera for other stuff too (of course you can also use a DSLR for other stuff, just "different" other stuff). Something like the Canon XF100 is compact and probably what one would call "entry level Pro" if you can have such a thing.
    Tim

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