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Thread: t3i settings for twixtor

  1. Default t3i settings for twixtor

    Hello,

    I'm a noob, learning as I go. I'm attempting to shoot some video with my t3i (efs 18-55mm lens) to use with the slo mo software twixtor. What are the camera settings I need? This will be outdoors in full sun (what would i need to change for indoor lighting?)

    I have searched around and found the following settings off a youtube video:

    I have tried iso 200, av all the way down (3.5), and shutter speed all the way up to 4000, movie record size 1280 x 720 60fps.

    With these settings, the picture is way too dark. I think I need to change the apeture, which I thought was done by turning the clickwheel but that changes the shutter speed (4000-60).

    Someone straighten me out.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    In very simple terms, those settings you are changing all affect the amount of light in your picture. They will not really affect the quality of slow motion. Assuming you shoot at 60ps, I would use a shutter speed of 1/120, keep the iso low and adjust the f-stop do that the preview has the brightness you want. Change the f stop b holding the av button as you turn the wheel.

  3. Default

    f-stop is apeture, right?

  4. #4

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    yeah right! for twixtor use iso 100-200 f3,5 and the important part is the fps..you have to change the quality from 1080p to 720p and 60fps..the shutter speed should be (2xfps) in video..so you have to go for 120 because if you increase the shutter speed you will have a jelly effect wich is not nice..I supose you are a starter and maybe you should try at auto iso at the begining! You can install magic lantern which is a great tool for your t3i btw!

  5. Default

    thanks a lot guys! I will try your suggestions tomorrow.

    I have found a lot of videos on youtube using very high shutter speeds 1600-4000. why would you use such a high shutter speed? I am a beginner but for slo motion purposes I would think you would want the camera "seeing" the image(s) the shortest amount of time possible thus your suggestion for 120. Am I on the right track with that thinking? And why 2 times the fps?

  6. #6

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    if you have the camera somewhere still maybe a higher shutter speed will be better..but if you are moving the xamera you are going to have a jelly effect! specialy with canon and t3i! I have the same camera too and it is awesome!

  7. #7

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    yeah right! i forgot to mention that! sky is da best backround for twixtor in my opinion!

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by risk52 View Post
    yeah right! for twixtor use iso 100-200 f3,5 and the important part is the fps..you have to change the quality from 1080p to 720p and 60fps..the shutter speed should be (2xfps) in video..so you have to go for 120 because if you increase the shutter speed you will have a jelly effect wich is not nice..I supose you are a starter and maybe you should try at auto iso at the begining! You can install magic lantern which is a great tool for your t3i btw!
    the general rule for a natural motion blur is a shutter speed at twice the fps (25fps, 1/50 etc...)
    that "jelly effect" is by no means "not nice", but I guess one could say it's "not natural". but it has been used in major pictures, one of the most known scenes is that beach war scene in "saving private ryan"

    I'm not a twixtor expert, but from what I gather, twixtor will "add" frames in order to smoothen the slow motion, simulating a higher fps than the one you originally shot with. In that regard, I'm not sure that a "natural blur" would actually help twixtor getting a very slow motion. So for that particular case, I'd stick with your 60fps advice, but I'd definitely speed up the shutter speed in order to have little to no motion blur at all (which depends on your subject motion speed relating to your shutter speed)

    just for any other shot, there is no "ideal" setting, it will depend on your subject, available light etc... but I'd definitely go with a fast shutter speed if I were to put the footage through a software that would guess and recreate additional frames from existing material.

    ISO setting is not directly related to that, but with higher shutter speeds, it may be a necessity to crank it up, depending on the available light.

    I'd also avoid to go all the way up to f3.5 if possible, entry level lenses are not reputed to give their best performance with a fully open aperture.

    I see people telling stuff about that shutter speed/FPS relation, and I do believe it's very important to actually know the basic rules. But by no means it is written in stone and one should also experiment in order to create. First copy, imitate, learn, then experiment.
    Obviously, the OP is not quite there yet, but still, I'd avoid pressing a beginner with rules that would seem "absolute". Some of the best innovations were done by people thinking outside the box. But it's first important to know what that "box" is and where are its limits.

    Back on topic, I'd go to 60fps/720p first, then depending on the light, get to a shutter speed fast enough to nullify any motion blur (or maybe leave a little, it's your job to find out here), stop your lens around f4 or f5.6 at least (but you want to avoid going all the way up over f11), adjust the iso so your picture is bright enough (on the t3i/600d you can probably go up to 1600 with very few impact on image quality, which would allow you, at say f5.6, maybe 1/300ish shutter speed, to film in fairly low light situations, maybe not at night, but inside by day should be alright), then shoot, try it out, rinse, repeat, until you find a setting you like (and learn a few things in the process)

    I've read someone talking about magic lantern firmware, which is a jewel of a firmware... if you know what to do with it. For now, I'd suggest you to leave it alone, first get to learn the basics, then, when you will begin to see your hardware limitations, you will start to understand why it's such a great tool and why you would want to have it. Then take it, it'll give a new life to your DSLR and open a world of new possibilities. But right now, it will be more confusing and much less easy to use, so I'd strongly suggest to leave it alone.


    Also, if you're a beginner, since you already have a DSLR, I'd strongly suggest you to learn the basics of photography (which are a good introduction to filming), use your camera as a camera first, learn the rules of composition and take pictures. Stills are much easier to take and set up than movies, but the basic principles are the same, technical and artistic. It's also much faster to work on stills, therefore you will learn much faster the filming basics by doing still photography, use softwares such as lightroom for example, work with your images, get the most out of them. Then once you're comfortable taking nice looking pictures and using the photography softwares, you will be ready to take on the next dimension: motion and rhythm.

    I feel that using programs such as twixtor as a beginner who doesn't know the most basic principles of exposure and photography is too big of a leap. Of course you can still use it, play with it, learn how to use it, it's never going to be a loss, but you should focus on what makes good pictures first, because if you don't have the basics, twixtor will not turn a poorly shot footage into a professionally looking film, nor would any other piece of software, or all film makers would be out of a job in a minute.

    it's already a good thing that you came in here looking for advice, this one may not be the advice you were looking for, however, I think it's an important advice. You can't drive a porsche if you don't have a driving license, you can try, but you will surely fail and it will surely be a disappointing experience. It's the same here, you got some gear, but if you don't know how to use it, you will not be able to use it. Unless, and there's probably one in a billion chance, you are naturally gifted, exceptionally talented and a natural and outstanding artist.

    but most of us are just grinders, the learning process is a grind, it's slow, it's hard, but it's rewarding and it'll change you as a human being, turn you into a better person. it's still a grind, you got to start at some points with the basics, figure out if you really want to do it, and keep doing it until you die or you are not physically able to do it anymore.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by risk52 View Post
    yeah right! i forgot to mention that! sky is da best backround for twixtor in my opinion!
    I have never used it. But I think any algorithm to 'add' (as hadoq's post describes) frames can run into problems when moving objects cross paths (e.g. 2 persons walking across the screen in opposing directions). Unless the software can understand what the objects look like before they cross, then it will get confused ('jelly' occurs) when the background objects emerges from the foreground object. And that distortion will be even more visible if there is any movement blur.
    Moving an object against a plain background is clearly better (e.g. the sky, as recommended by risk52).

  10. #10

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    Make sure u shoot aganist a plain background at 59.94fps (overcast sky is best) and again obey the basic rule of double your shutter speed. for example if you want to twixtor down to 2000fps shoot at 1/4000th

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