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Thread: Can I shorten editing times by upgrading my graphics card?

  1. #1

    Default Can I shorten editing times by upgrading my graphics card?

    Hi,

    We recently purchased an HD camcorder and Sony Vegas Movie Studio HD Platinum. After finding that the video rendering took a crazy amount of time for a 5 minute clip (1 hour 30 minutes) I decided to look into ways of speeding it up short of buying a brand new PC.

    I should say that the video was captured as 1080p. I upgraded the old processor from a 2 core Phenom to a 6 core Phenom and overclocked it. This seemed to bring down the rendering time by about 1/3. Now I want to see if I can eek a liitle more performance out of the PC. One of the ways that I have come across is to upgrade the graphics card as I have read that with certain software the GPU can be used to help speed up video processing.

    I know that not all software is written to take advantage of this feature and with some software turning on this feature can actually slow down video rendering. What I want to ask is, can Sony Vegas take advantage of this feature to speed up processing and would a better GPU lead to slightly faster processing?

    Current GPU is NVIDIA GeForce 8400GS

  2. #2
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    That sees like an excessive amount of time if you haven't added too many effects. Are you:

    keeping system files on one drive, video files on another and output to a third?
    resizing or manipulating the video in any way as part of the export?
    matching the timeline to the media pproperties?

  3. #3
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    sanessley, welcome here; as you have been told it's not only the processor/Graphics card that affect Performance.

    I have a dual-core PC with several internal SATA drives- that's where the Media is copied (from camera flash memory). I'm not aware of any graphic acceleration, either.

    My "Render-factor" is typically five. So your 5-min clip would be rendered in 25mins. As Marc Peters suggests this is without over-fancy effects.....like the more-exotic Transitions, Key-framing, etc. Also I rarely use more than six tracks, four for visuals and two for audio.

    So I think we need to know a little more of your system. I've completly discarded USB2 for storing work-in-progress . . . although they are fine for Duplicate Copies of general Media Clips. Others here will say it's OK, and you can check the performance of File Transfer.....by copying something like 16G.

    Another point: the Render factor=5 is in the same format as the original footage 1080i (not "p"), so this may have a marginal effect too. Having completed this render to a folder MovieHDD, I can put several of these "shorts" onto a DVD, but this requires another Rendering process, as the quality has to be downgraded to suit DVD's.
    Another Factor that may assist: Making a multi-title DVD from previously rendered stuff, can take 3.5 hrs for 2.4Gb - which is almost half the DVD capacity. Again the DVD and all HDD file locations are SATA internal. I've had some sucess with external drives, but only eSATA seems to be satisfactory - yet this standard is almost "history".

    BTW - wish I had the PC power you have..... yet Render-times are part of Life, and you can go out and mow the lawn, do some shopping or go to bed knowing the PC will grind away until it's done.
    Last edited by vidmanners; 10-15-2012 at 10:20 PM.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by sannesley View Post
    One of the ways that I have come across is to upgrade the graphics card as I have read that with certain software the GPU can be used to help speed up video processing.

    I know that not all software is written to take advantage of this feature and with some software turning on this feature can actually slow down video rendering. What I want to ask is, can Sony Vegas take advantage of this feature to speed up processing and would a better GPU lead to slightly faster processing?

    Current GPU is NVIDIA GeForce 8400GS
    Woah, back up the bus here!!

    Firstly, check to see if Movie Studio supports GPU acceleration.

    Secondly, the slowing down is due to enabling GPU video acceleration for video processing. Not the same as rendering. In rendering I can check to see if this IS able for my renders. Also not ALL rendering templates allow for GPU render assist.

    Thirdly, you really want to check to make sure your existing GPU is suitable for, what I'm sure you'd need, VegasPro. Movie studio? Check that too for suitability. Here's the Sony recommended GPU cards and, . . . . wait for it . . . ta-rah: DRIVERS! Yes, not ONLY would you need VPro11/12, the correct card and the correct driver you'd also need the correct version of that driver too. Here's Sony's GPU suitability chart, and benchmarks for your quiet contemplation: Vegas Pro 12 GPU acceleration

    So, there is much for you to do to research. And more precise details you're needing to wrangle out too.

    I spent at least 7 months scoping, prior to ordering my PC. Here are my speccs:

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~
    System #1


    Windows Version: 7 64-bit

    RAM: 16gb

    Processor: Intel® Core™i7-2600k Quad Core 3.40GHz
    Video Card: 2GB NVIDIA GEFORCE GTX 560 Ti - 2 DVI,HDMI,VGA - D
    Sound Card: External PreSonus Audiobox
    Video Capture: PanaDeckTHEN onto 1394; CF Card Reader
    CD Burner: see below
    DVD Burner: 12x BLU-RAY RE-WRITER DRIVE, 16x DVD ±R/±RW
    Camera: Canon: XF300 (HD) & XM2 (SD)
    Add. Comments: Graphics Card Driver:- Installed : 11 Aug 2012 | Ver : 8.17.13.142 | Date : 15 May 2012

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Please do note my Video card AND the detail concerning my driver version and date.

    . . . . . .

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by sannesley
    We recently purchased an HD camcorder and Sony Vegas Movie Studio HD Platinum. After finding that the video rendering took a crazy amount of time for a 5 minute clip (1 hour 30 minutes) I decided to look into ways of speeding it up short of buying a brand new PC.
    Apologies for any misunderstanding on this aspect. This figure for rendering time was based on editing software that came with the camcorder. The software is HD Writer AE 4.0. At the time of writing this post I hadn't used Sony Vegas in anger but only looked at couple of the how to videos. Since then I have tried the exact same clips in Sony Vegas. The total length of clips comes in at 6min 54sec. Rendering time for these was 20 minutes give or take a few seconds. This is a lot faster than the HD Writer software so I'm pleased in that respect. That roughly equates to a 3:1 ratio of rendering time so would I be right in assuming that 1 hour of HD video would equate to 3 hours rendering time?

    Quote Originally Posted by vidmanners
    So I think we need to know a little more of your system
    AMD Phenom 1090T Black edition overclocked to 3.6GHz
    8Gb DDR2 PC2-6400
    Windows 7 64bit
    Western Digital 1Tb internal HDD (software)
    Western Digital 640Gb internal (Operating system)
    Lacie 1Tb external connected through USB

    Camera: Panasonic HC-V700EB-K


    Quote Originally Posted by Grazie
    Firstly, check to see if Movie Studio supports GPU acceleration.
    I came across this on the PC Advisor website: "Like Sony's Vegas Pro 10, Movie Studio HD Platinum 11 offers GPU acceleration for encoding to Sony's .avc format; Sony says that "traditional projects suggest up to 20 percent improvement" in rendering speed. Sony also says that it works not only with "select" Nvidia-based graphics cards, but also with select ATI cards"

    What those "select cards" are I'll have to research and find out a bit more about the pro's and con's of using the Sony .avc format

    [EDIT]
    A bit of searching turned up below:

    GPU usage in Vegas Movie Studio HD Platinum 11.
    Published 08/26/2011 02:47 PM | Updated 08/29/2011 11:12 AM
    Which devices compatible with Vegas Movie Studuio HD Platinum 11 for using the GPU enabled features?
    · NVIDIA GPUs
    GPU-accelerated AVC rendering requires a CUDA-enabled GPU and NVIDIA driver 185.xx or later with a GeForce GT 2xx Series or newer GPU.
    · ATI GPUs
    OpenCL GPU-accelerated rendering requires an OpenCL-enabled ATI GPU and AMD Radeon Catalyst driver 11.2 or later with an ATI Radeon HD 57xx or newer GPU. If using an ATI FirePro GPU, FirePro unified driver 8.773 or later is required.

    A list of CUDA enabled NVIDIA GPUs shows that my current graphics card is in that list and I have checked and the driver is newer than version 185.xx. Unfortunately my GPU is GS so it looks like I might have to upgrade if I want to take advantage of this feature



    Last edited by sannesley; 10-18-2012 at 07:01 PM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by sannesley View Post
    Lacie 1Tb external connected through USB
    If that's USB2.x then assuming your footage is on that, that's your bottleneck. It has nothing like the sustained throughput rates of SATA. USB 3 is vastly superior (apparently, I've not used it - I always keep my footage on SATA connected drives)

    There's no reason not to have software and OS on the same disk. Put your footage on a separate disk and preferably output to a third disk.

    Quote Originally Posted by sannesley View Post

    I came across this on the PC Advisor website: "Like Sony's Vegas Pro 10, Movie Studio HD Platinum 11 offers GPU acceleration for encoding to Sony's .avc format;

    The key thing to note here is "for Sony's avc format". If you're not rendering to Sony's avc format, then it doesn't do anything.
    Having said that, I thought that the acceleration was used in more formats now. I don't pay a lot of attention though, because render times don't particularly worry me - I'm happy so long as I get fairly smooth playback when editing.
    Tim

  7. #7

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    It also works for MainConcept's AVC.

    The other trick is that you can "force" to render CPU, or CUDA or OPenGL. It will also allow you to check to see IF CUDA is available.

    This is really at the edge of Sony Vegas development, and we are seeing benefits but also errors and I've had an auto request from Vegas to switch of the acceleraion while this is being investigated.

    . . . . . .

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