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Thread: My first video, Bushcraft basic woodcarving.

  1. #1

    Default My first video, Bushcraft basic woodcarving.

    Hi guys,

    i'm completely new to video editing and filming, I've just uploaded my first video to youtube. i would really appreciate it if you could give a novice some tips on both edititng and filming to improve my video.

    Thanks,
    Ste


  2. #2

    Default

    With videos like this the sound is very important. On this occasion I think you get away with it BUT it wouldn't take much wind or other background noise to make the audio more problematic. I would recommend getting a mic closer to you. This will give you better audio and increase the production value and professional appearance of your videos.

    It's good that you zoomed in to give us a closer look at what your doing but rather than cropping the image. Simply do it again with the camera repositioned. It will give you a better quality image on the close ups.

    The only other thing to look out for is the colour balance try to do a manual white balance on the camera before filming and so long as the light doesn't change you will have less trouble trying to keep continuity.

    I thought you did a very good job over all especially considering this is your first video. I hope the above tips help you in the future.

    Well done.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Midnight Blue View Post
    With videos like this the sound is very important. On this occasion I think you get away with it BUT it wouldn't take much wind or other background noise to make the audio more problematic. I would recommend getting a mic closer to you. This will give you better audio and increase the production value and professional appearance of your videos.

    It's good that you zoomed in to give us a closer look at what your doing but rather than cropping the image. Simply do it again with the camera repositioned. It will give you a better quality image on the close ups.

    The only other thing to look out for is the colour balance try to do a manual white balance on the camera before filming and so long as the light doesn't change you will have less trouble trying to keep continuity.

    I thought you did a very good job over all especially considering this is your first video. I hope the above tips help you in the future.

    Well done.
    Thanks for the great tips and compliments, i will have to read up on the white balance. I'm not sure what mic i should use i have a panasonic camcorder that has a mic input as i did think i may want to upgrade and buy a mic at some point.

    Ste

  4. #4

    Default

    Thanks, I actually learnt something
    I wished you were closer to the camera. Your legs get more screen space than your arms/body/head.
    I advise watching your left hand. It tends to wander around, continuously emphasising what you are saying.
    Nice work.

  5. #5

    Default

    I think a clip on mic would probably work best for you but I can't advise on a particular one.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    London, England
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    Default

    Excellent for a first vid and agree with other earlier comments.
    I presume you had an assistant to get those zoom-ins, or was that in Edit maybe?

    The presenter's name was not clear enough (I missed it) and could be white on the shady background, or introduce a shadow effect helps remove the breaking up with the background.
    A small tie-clip mic will work wonders, even those from Amazon at about 4 will lift the audio. . . . and maybe later buy a SDHC recorder so the camera is not tied to the mic (use the camera audio track for sync, although Good Practice is to clap your hands in view of the camera.). These recorders have a Level-meter so you can double-check it's OK without going to the camera...and they are very portable . . about 70 for basic "Zoom" model.

    Also, I think some degree of faking is worthwhile, - you can green-screen the woodland and have brighter lighting on the close-up hand detail. You may need to spray "duller" on the blade as well, to prevent bright-spots. (Art-shops). This means the whole scene is under your control and if you get it right you can mix "real" with "Studio" and no-one will know. You need to watch the direction of light so the shadows are consistent, too.
    +Match the audio to the scene, so you get "close-mic sound" only on close-ups . . . . you'll soon get the "ear" for what's right.
    Although in general it doesn't matter it's the CONTENT that's important . . . only for fellow videomakers, it's worth pushing the technique....

    Well done.

    A great effort and I would like to see that fire-strike in slowmo . . . maybe later, then?
    Last edited by vidmanners; 10-14-2012 at 01:44 AM.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vidmanners View Post
    Excellent for a first vid and agree with other earlier comments.
    I presume you had an assistant to get those zoom-ins, or was that in Edit maybe?

    The presenter's name was not clear enough (I missed it) and could be white on the shady background, or introduce a shadow effect helps remove the breaking up with the background.
    A small tie-clip mic will work wonders, even those from Amazon at about 4 will lift the audio. . . . and maybe later buy a SDHC recorder so the camera is not tied to the mic (use the camera audio track for sync, although Good Practice is to clap your hands in view of the camera.). These recorders have a Level-meter so you can double-check it's OK without going to the camera...and they are very portable . . about 70 for basic "Zoom" model.

    Also, I think some degree of faking is worthwhile, - you can green-screen the woodland and have brighter lighting on the close-up hand detail. You may need to spray "duller" on the blade as well, to prevent bright-spots. (Art-shops). This means the whole scene is under your control and if you get it right you can mix "real" with "Studio" and no-one will know. You need to watch the direction of light so the shadows are consistent, too.
    +Match the audio to the scene, so you get "close-mic sound" only on close-ups . . . . you'll soon get the "ear" for what's right.

    Although in general it doesn't matter it's the CONTENT that's important . . . only for fellow videomakers, it's worth pushing the technique....

    Well done.

    A great effort and I would like to see that fire-strike in slowmo . . . maybe later, then?
    Thanks for the tips, i will put a shadow effect on the presenters name. It was a zoom edit i was using as i am also the presenter. I'm not sure what a SDHC recorder is, it sounds very useful. would i be able to hide the wires and tie clip mic if i had one?
    I don't have a studio so unfortunately i can't use a green screen.

    Thanks again,
    Ste.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Surrey, UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by stecarey View Post
    I'm not sure what a SDHC recorder is, it sounds very useful. would i be able to hide the wires and tie clip mic if i had one?
    An SDHC recorder is a digital recorder that records to and SDHC card - like your camera does. It is (usually) small enough to fit inside a pocket. Yes, you run a wire under your clothes to the device. Your tie-clip mic will eb visible, but that's no big deal - it's not like a drama, people are quite happy to see evidence of the recording setup when filming documentaries. Indeed several programnmes make a feature of it (I don't know if you've seen "Deadly 60" on CBBC, but the presenter there talks o the crew and we regularly see cameras and boom mics getting into boats, getting close-ups etc)

    If you want to avoid that, the only option is todrafty another person in to operate a boom mic.

    Take a look at the Zoom H1/H2/H4 range of recorders. You can plug an external mic into any of these. Other models are available (theres aTascam something or other that someone here uses, and there are several more "professional" makes)
    Tim

  9. #9

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    Don't worry about the green screen suggestion it would totally ruin the series if you wasn't really out there in the woods doing it. The Zoom H1 is small but not as well made as the H2. The H4n is the best of the bunch but would only really be needed if you have a mic with an XLR plug so I'd recommend the H2 for your needs.

  10. #10

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    Your voice is relatively soft as the music tends to cover up your voice more..

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