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Thread: New to HD editing

  1. #1

    Default New to HD editing

    Hello everybody, I have recently bought a Macbook pro to do my wildlife photo editing on the move , I also thought Id like to make some wildlife videos.
    Id like to buy a camcorder like the panasonic HS900 3CCD or similar Sony or Canon .PAL format
    My question is which camcorder that records to memory cards or internal solid state memory works with a Mac, which is the best video converter (looks like Ill need one} and will I be able to edit on final cut pro x or Adobe premiere pro ?

    Im not bothered about having to convert video as long as it works well .

    Many thanks folks .

  2. #2
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    What camera do you use for stills? It may be possible to use your camera for video, or upgrade your stills camera to one that has a video mode. This could be the cheapest route.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Peters View Post
    What camera do you use for stills? It may be possible to use your camera for video, or upgrade your stills camera to one that has a video mode. This could be the cheapest route.

    Thanks for the rapid reply, I use a Nikon D3 which does not have video , dslrs have major restrictions when shooting video, the main one for me is you can't do a smooth slow zoom even with top pro lenses.

    I was about to buy a Panasonic HS900 but it is not supported by Apple , they do not support any camcorders that record on internal SSD storage or SD cards BUT most people do convert video and there seems to be several conversion progs so all is not lost.

    Im really now looking for info from anyone who shoots, converts and edits on Mac to tell me what they use and how well it works.

  4. #4

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    It's considered "poor practise" to have zooms in your videos. Doing a cut from a long shot to a close up is much better. A Nikon D3 is a very good camera, I saw one of the top nature photographers doing a talk and I think I remember that the camera he used was the D4, he also used it for video. I think it would be an ideal camera for nature videos. I've been looking at getting the new D800 as I've heard the video side is better than the D4. It's also cheaper. Buying a camera just for a motorised zoom isn't a good reason to get one also I don't think you will be able to get the strength of zoom you need from a fixed lens video camera although they have gotten better.

    Just my opinion.

  5. #5
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    I don't like zooms much either, but I think what you are suggesting is the very popular "fast pan to slow zoom" that always blows people away in reality shows like Survivor and The Amazing Race. Bam!

    For Wildlife I'd personally go with the Canon XA10 due to:
    - low light performance
    - compact form factor (you will thank me when you are crawling around in the underbrush)

    Note: If you are planning to record audio separately, then you could probably go with the consumer version of the same camera (I think it is the HF G10).

    Zam

  6. #6

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    Yes I take your point, Zooming is a very amateur thing and should be used sparingly , it has its place though if used tastefully.
    I did think about a D800 but Im not impressed with its 4fps its no good fro wildlife action shots like flying birds or running animals etc. Reviews have suggested that for still images any bad technique with long lenses 500mm 600mm shows up as a blurred image, because of the high pixel density it also amplifies any movement , it also produces more "noise" in low light than my D3 12mp , there is a trade off with pixels and noise.
    So Ive still got the camcorder mind set .

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by zamiotana View Post
    I don't like zooms much either, but I think what you are suggesting is the very popular "fast pan to slow zoom" that always blows people away in reality shows like Survivor and The Amazing Race. Bam!

    For Wildlife I'd personally go with the Canon XA10 due to:
    - low light performance
    - compact form factor (you will thank me when you are crawling around in the underbrush)

    Note: If you are planning to record audio separately, then you could probably go with the consumer version of the same camera (I think it is the HF G10).

    Zam
    Thanks , Ill look at the Canon XA10 . I will be using an external mic but not recording audio separately.
    Do you edit on a Mac ? my initial post was about apple not supporting HD 1080-50p without converting it and which video converter was best.
    I might just wait a while to see if in the near future some manufacturer will make a camcorder that records in a format that mac can use without conversion.

  8. #8

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    I'm not a Mac user but my understanding is that Final Cut Pro will only deal with quick time formats so it automatically converts footage for editing. This may not be totally accurate as I'm not a Mac user. As a caveat let me make it clear I don't have a Mac.

  9. #9
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    seems odd that Apple doesn't allow mainstream camcorders to be used directly . . . is that good Marketing? Must be a function of FCP...?

    Zooming is great, if you can't do it. And there is no reason not to do it, - as I understand it it is when it's In-Out-In-Out that's not good. However a small shift to frame the shot is acceptable and many "prosumer" cameras allow the zoom to be programmed for speed . . . so you can do it quite slowly.
    I do like the XA10, but I'm not sure if it has LANC - that seems to be my next requirement, along with ext. mic-in and gain-settings on the Audio.

  10. Default

    I have final cut express (on a macbook pro) and I have used several camcorders that store the 1080 footage on an SD card. It is all in how you import the footage. If you try and copy and past the footage off the SD card, onto your mac's hdd and then import into final cut, it will not work as camcorders compress the files hugely. So, you have to plug the camcorder into your mac using a usb cable, head into final cut and use "log and transfer." It will take all your footage, transcode it and it will be editable and playable on final cut.

    I have not used premiere on a mac, so I am not sure of the process. However, I'm sure it is similar. I have done this with a samsung, canon and sony camcorder. All full HD files.

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