Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Getting Fed!

  1. Default Getting Fed!

    Was at a wedding a few days ago and a meal wasn't provided... yet again!

    At another wedding two weeks ago I was promised a meal... but after having to chase the co-ordinator and countless servers, I was eventually furnished with one... minutes before the speeches started.

    Does anyone on this forum stipulate in their contract that they must get fed? I am finding that at 70% of the weddings I film, a meal is not provided (let's put this into context, my day starts at 9am and I am there until 11pm...)

    There's nothing nicer than sitting while everyone is eating, and being approached by a few of the guests who make it a priority that we are eating too, and the cherry on top is a decent venue where the hot plates of food are on our laps within 5 minutes.

    Unfortunately, this is too rare these days. I don't know what it's like in the US, but this is the state of affairs in the UK.

    From the client's point of view, I know meals at these places are really expensive, but surely the wedding co-ordinator could sneak us a spare a hot plate of food on the house, considering there is food they will probably be throwing out.
    Last edited by griffinmill; 05-26-2012 at 09:41 AM.

  2. #2

    Default

    When I saw the subject that UP was missing from FED, but no, the usual reoccurring no meal at weddings gripe.

    As a seasoned (no pun intended) videographer, I am guessing your new to the scene.
    When I started, I to went round looking for scraps, but in those days it was mainly village halls and so outside caterers were involved, so you could ponce one of them, normally, but as you say not until just before the speeches start. So when you came back it was either cold or gone....

    It is in my contract these days and checked before the day to make sure it is not overlooked, working all day without refreshments is tuff especially on hot days. I did try sandwiches but they I am not a lover of them and they are normally warm and not very tasty time I got to them.

    Strangely any foreign type wedding (Asian, Jewish etc) they expect you to eat and normally supply a separate suppliers table.
    Being in that category myself (just) the first thing any visitor coming to my house gets offered refreshments or food if they are working for me. Perhaps its social manners or years of struggling with no food at weddings and so can relate to it.

    my T&C

    13) Operator requirements.
    If the camera operator is to film for longer then 4 hours then some form of hot refreshment must be provided.

    Good luck
    Last edited by Z Cheema; 05-26-2012 at 10:41 AM.

  3. #3

    Default

    I'm in total agreement. Like yourself we used to rely on good ole british hospitality, alas it's all in the past. It's been in our contract for the last few years that refreshments must be provided for 2 operators, or we may have to leave the premises to dine and may miss part of the proceedings.
    Most of our clients are kind enough to volunteer this anyway, but I still remind them verbally at our last meeting and make sure they request that the venue supplies this as soon as the guests are dining. If you try to ask on the day, you've more chance of getting snow in July than a sandwich.
    I must admit, many spoil us too. We've often had a table reserved for us with the full monty and a bottle of champagne to swill it down with. Too kind! I'm happier with sandwiches, fries and a large jug of coffee. Stipulate this in your contract and remind the venue on arrival when checking the schedule for the the celebration.
    My opinions are just that . . . Mine. It's not personal, but is based on my emotional and professional reaction to requested critique. If you choose to ignore constructive comments, I'll just assume you're a vanity poster and not posting to improve your filming and editing skills.

    Ex A.P.V Videomaker of the year - Ex M.M. IOV Come join my EXclusive club

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Kent
    Posts
    11,526
    Blog Entries
    24

    Default

    As an amateur video chap, but a consultant by trade, I often have a different perspective to you guys.

    If I'm working with a client, I would typically expect lunch. It just makes it easier to work through lunch and socialise. If I'm merely on site, I woukdn't expect lunch, but I might justifiable charge as an expense where I am away from home for a while.

    To put that into perspective, I would include this in my expenses as a videographer. When Andy and rib if these forums filmed my wedding, I suggested they put their expenses on the room bill.

    And on my brief forays into videography many years ago, this is the exact approach I took. I either charged my meal on the final bill, or this was paid for on the day.

  5. #5

    Default

    We never demand a meal as it's so much easier to come along with sandwiches/cereal bars/bottles of water etc & eat when we want to & not try a grab mouthfuls when it's convenient for the caterers. We do always graciously accept a meal if it is offered & at the large Asian & Jewish weddings we have filmed there is always a suppliers table set up for the photographer, band, DJ etc However we prefer to be self-sufficient so aren't setting ourselves up for disappointment.

    I don't provide a meal for our gardener & he brings sandwiches & a flask. Likewise if we had any other tradesman round like a plumber I would expect them to make their own arrangements & hide the expense in their total bill. I have seen other suppliers get quite arsey when a meal is missing/late/cold & it may well be the fault of the caterers. What are you going to do if no meal arrives? Complain to the bride & groom? A whining videographer is hardly likely to be the highlight of their day.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nigelbb View Post
    What are you going to do if no meal arrives? Complain to the bride & groom? A whining videographer is hardly likely to be the highlight of their day.
    That's never happened and no half decent supplier would ever dream of even mentioning it to clients at all.
    Supplying refreshments to video/tog crews who are working 12 hours at a wedding is a very silly comparison to a gardener
    Though If your particular gardener is working 12 hours, yes, you should insist they had a hot meal with you. Common courtesy I'd say.
    My opinions are just that . . . Mine. It's not personal, but is based on my emotional and professional reaction to requested critique. If you choose to ignore constructive comments, I'll just assume you're a vanity poster and not posting to improve your filming and editing skills.

    Ex A.P.V Videomaker of the year - Ex M.M. IOV Come join my EXclusive club

  7. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Zero View Post
    That's never happened and no half decent supplier would ever dream of even mentioning it to clients at all.
    Too true! I don't get fed on about 70% of the weddings I film and I have never/would never mention it to a client - ever.

    As for the "you wouldn't feed a painter/general labourer" argument. Well, let's put it into its proper context. Say the painter came round to your house to paint your living room wall at 9am and was going to be working until 11pm - or even midnight. And then say around 7pm everybody in the house plus a few of their friends and family came round for a four-course meal with all the trimmings - and the painter was unable to work on the room because everyone was eating, so he had to find a quite corner to sit and meditate in.

    And let's say nobody spoke to him or came near him until the dishes were being put away - and only then it was to tell him that he could get back to work.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by griffinmill View Post
    And let's say nobody spoke to him or came near him until the dishes were being put away - and only then it was to tell him that he could get back to work.
    Your analogy brought a smile to my face. Boy would I hate to be a painter!!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Surrey, UK
    Posts
    10,842
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    No experience in videoing weddings or any pro jobs come to that, but I have played dozens as a member of a band.
    I don't think equating someone coming to your home to work and a wedding is particularly relevant.
    At home, you are in an environments where you know where everything is and how everything runs. Offering a cuppa here or a hot meal there is, as has been suggested, a matter of courtesy.

    However, when organising a wedding, this is most likely a one-off for the B&G. They have 1001 things to think about, most of which they will never have dealt with before in their life. This is why Hotels & the like when booking receptions will go through a checklist (have you thought about this? Have you thought about that?) Quite honestly it's a pretty organised sort of person who wlll, without prompting, consider what the various "trades people" who make up the day will eat. It's so outside their frame of reference for the day.

    This is why it is so important to bring it to the B&Gs attention as well as have it in the contract. It's also worth speaking with the caterers at the earliest opportunity - just ask "Just wanted to check where and when will be eating?" This gives the caterers an opportunity to save face if they've cocked up or argue the toss if they haven't been booked to feed you. If established that there's a cock-up and you're not being fed, at least you know early and stand more chance of making alternative arrangements than if you leave it until the speeches are about to start.
    Tim

  10. #10

    Default

    Some great comments on this. Takes me back to a wedding I filmed mid 1980's. Most of them I was invited to a meal buffet or what ever but never expected it.

    Though on one occasion the reception was in a posh hotel in Poole Dorset overlooking fabulous panoramic sea views with tables laid for 150 guest and a 4 course meal . Like money was no object. I filmed the cake before the guest arrived then was told to wait in the bar (which was closed)along with the photographer behind closed doors. No one came out an offered us any refreshments. I was parched and starving. We were then invited to film the Cutting of the cake and speeches.

    To cap it all. I contacted the groom a few days later to say the video was ready Its 50. He said "could we pay you at the end of the month". I was astonished, and said No, give me a call and Ill drop it to you. Guess what I have still got the video. Oh it turns out the groom worked in a bank.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •