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Thread: Quitting the day job?

  1. #1
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    Default Quitting the day job?

    Some wise words from a photographer that are equally true for any creative: Ditching the “Day” Job: Lessons Learned Going Full Time
    Last edited by Marc Peters; 02-07-2012 at 08:06 PM.

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    Yes, very good advice from a man with his feet on the ground.

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    It's so true about boundaries as well!

    When you start working all day all night, Your mental health starts to sag, You get a bit depressed and unhappy from time to time, It really does suck the life out of you in a very short space of time.

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    I recommend co-working. Renting a cheap desk space once a week or every other, to work in with other freelancers. Great for human interaction and helping to network with different industries.

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    If that is impractical you could join trade associations like the IOV which has a good forum or even a videography forum if you can find one.

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    Making the leap from full time paid employment to working for yourself full time does have it's drawbacks, though the benefits, once successful, far outweigh these.
    Anyone who has made the leap soon realises that it's not just the office banter/networking that's missing, it's the being led by the nose on all sorts of projects that you would do oh so differently if it was your own money and manpower at risk.
    Once the mindset of earning your own keep for real is reached, you soon realise that photography/video skills/networking alone aren't enough. I've said it before on this forum, being a busy fool is kidding yourself. Turnover is the easy bit and profit is definitely King. As time goes on you soon build a network of clients who recommend you and fellow producers who can help each other out in times of high demand + venue suppliers that we meet regularly at events coverage.

    Making creative videos in a distinctive style, deciding where to put your money when it comes to advertising, meeting new clients and keeping in touch with old ones + account keeping need more than one good head to keep on top of. No-one is a master of all these skills so a willing partner who's on the same wavelength is essential.
    The trouble is with a working partner, that profit needs to double too, so business skills, especially in these troubled times need to be sharp as a pointy thing.
    I'm fortunate that my wife is great at marketing, networking and accounts. I'm pretty useless and far too honest in my opinions, so I'm content for her to have free rein on that side while she leaves my head free to concentrate on the video/photography side.
    We always make time between jobs for relaxing but it's at times to suit us and not structured to a normal working week and annual holidays.
    Last edited by Zero; 02-07-2012 at 08:04 PM.
    My opinions are just that . . . Mine. It's not personal, but is based on my emotional and professional reaction to requested critique. If you choose to ignore constructive comments, I'll just assume you're a vanity poster and not posting to improve your filming and editing skills.

    Ex A.P.V Videomaker of the year - Ex M.M. IOV Come join my EXclusive club

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    I've been self employed since 1983 and can't agree more with what Zero has written above.

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    This is a great article, thanks for sharing.


    Although I dont work in wedding videography specifically, my work is still film based and I just wanted to share my experiences incase they might be of any value.

    I started in a partnership 4 years ago after leaving what I can now view as a fun, creative and relatively steady going job. I share all of Zero's points in his post - especially missing the daily social aspect side and being led by the nose! Unfortunately in my case the partnership I was involved in did not work out due to unforeseen personal and creative circumstances. Though I am now happily working self employed, I'd add my two cents in saying that it is so so important that you do plan for every eventuality from the start and any partnership has properly defined roles, with each partner taking on individual responsibilities as well as recognising/respecting in each individuals strengths - complimenting as opposed to clashing I suppose. Might sound basic stuff, but out of personal experience I can tell you that when the work is heavily on...or indeed off for longer than enjoyable periods of times and the stress levels are rising, respecting the people you work with is absolutely paramount.

    Another issue that has already been outlined was this 'expected working office hours of trade' thing - sat at a computer or by the phone even when there is nothing to do because you just think its the right thing to do and feel guilty if you do anything else un work related.... I learnt that one the hard way, and it doesn't create a great mindset to be in - especially working as a creative! Find a schedule that works for you, put the effort in, but don't torture yourself with idleness and unproductively waiting for that golden phone call or email which may not come... stay active and stay happy - the reason for going self employed is so you get the opportunity to do things the way you want to do them. Sometimes things will be slow going and at other times you'll be thinking how can I do all of it in that space of time... can be the nature of the beast, but since going self employed I havent had to miss one of my kids plays or sports events for work commitments out of my control. I also get to know my clients on a personal basis which makes work feel like its not...work. - There are some great benefits to going for it yourself for sure, and good luck to all that will be / already are

    Anyway I've rabbited on long enough.

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    Agreed with zero, its hard to make enough money to keep yourself going!


    Videgraphy Photography Editing

    HeatsProductions
    Last edited by Heatsproductions; 03-30-2013 at 01:47 PM.

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    It's also worth mentioning a very tired, but worthwhile phrase "Dont keep all your eggs in one basket" - Specialising makes you unique, but also very vulnerable if the market for that speciality dies.
    Diversity is the current key to survival. We offer filming, photography and training, duplication, DVD copy protection etc.
    If one, or even two areas go quieter than normal, we can still cope.
    One day this recession will lift and there is always . . . eventually, a boom after a recession, so those with the skills and kit in place when it does happen should be better prepared than ever.
    My opinions are just that . . . Mine. It's not personal, but is based on my emotional and professional reaction to requested critique. If you choose to ignore constructive comments, I'll just assume you're a vanity poster and not posting to improve your filming and editing skills.

    Ex A.P.V Videomaker of the year - Ex M.M. IOV Come join my EXclusive club

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