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Thread: Wind Cut vs Deadcat?

  1. #1

    Lightbulb Wind Cut vs Deadcat?

    My HDC-SD9 records pretty good quality audio however it picks up wind very easily. There is a "wind cut" option/setting that seems to work well. My question is what are the downsides to leaving the wind cut on all the time? It's hard to decipher whether the wind is strong enough to enable it but boy you certainly know it when it's too late. It must diminish the quality in SOME way leaving it on all the time, maybe in very quiet environment? Not like I can get a deadcat on my SD9 anyway but I was eventually going to pickup a sound/voice recorder and hook it up to a shotgun mic with a deadcat, possibly mount it under my camera using the screw mount (SD9 has no external audio inputs)
    Last edited by PinkFloydEffect; 06-26-2011 at 07:21 PM.
    Why am I an editor? ...because I'm a bad filmer!
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  2. #2
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    Wind cut is basically a low frequency filter which cuts out frequencies lower than normal speech. If you can remember, it should be switched on if in doubt as it won't noticeably adversely affect speech recordings with your set-up.

    The "dead cat" cuts out the noise before it reaches the microphone and is a much better option.

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    Okay, to explain a bit more, before someone whines that strictly speaking the Dead Cat doesn't cut out much sound. Wind hits the diaphram of the microphone and causes it to vibrate. Or it "brushes" past the capsule or foam windshield and an abrasive noise is created. This low frequency is filtered out by the "wind cut" feature.

    The Dead Cat stops the wind hitting the microphone and vibrating it without interrupting the vital sound waves.

    That's the theory. In practice it's quite difficult to achieve, which is why the cheapo (ie Chinese and Indian) deadcats are not at "good" as the decent makes (Rycote, Reinhardt and Sennheiser) in that they don't stop the wind as well as they could, and also tend to cut out a few of the frequencies which you would like to record!
    Last edited by Rembrandt Rob; 06-27-2011 at 10:52 AM.

  4. #4

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    Thank you for taking the time to explain that! That is what I was looking for; the wind cut uses a frequency ping out. I will do some more testing and see if I can find a desired frequency that it pings out.
    Why am I an editor? ...because I'm a bad filmer!
    ☮ ♫ ☾ ☆ ☼ ☯ ~ Live Long & Prosper

  5. #5
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    You'll probably find that it's a straight cut below 80hz, probably starting gradually at about 120hz or so.

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