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Thread: Edit Video Like in Star Wars?

  1. #1

    Default Edit Video Like in Star Wars?

    Years ago in the remaking of the Star Wars movies, the alien figures that was played by masked humans, were superimposed by CAD figures, with alien skin and whatnot. As much as I know, it was done by giving an input to the beginning frame of a sequence, and the software would remake the whole sequence.
    Question [1]
    I ask if anyone knows with which software and how to replace the whole figure in video. I know there is software for remaking whole sequences, I just don't know which is good enough.
    Question [2]
    Another thing would be to change the skin texture in, say, inch deep, then I could already change the actor into an alien. Naturally, also for whole sequences.
    --- If there are any video-savvy persons out there, please, let me know.
    NOTE I've tried several video forums, but got stupid replies like do each frame with photoshop. With a 30-min video it's almost 50,000 images. It seems some people don't realize the difference between still image and video editing.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by SEJedi View Post
    ..but got stupid replies like do each frame with photoshop...
    Which unless you have the facilties that Industrial Light and Magic have at their fingertips might be not such a daft answer after all.
    Just remember that Lucas had a zillion dollars and hundreds of people doing that work. I seriously doubt there's an (affordable) off the shelf piece of software that'll do what you want. It's extremely complex work.

    Quote Originally Posted by SEJedi View Post
    ..It seems some people don't realize the difference between still image and video editing....
    Without trying to sound like a smart arse - other people think video editing is mostly a case of push a button and it'll happen. It's not.

  3. #3

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    "it was done by giving an input to the beginning frame of a sequence, and the software would remake the whole sequence. "

    ...only if the original actor in a suit was wearing a complex system of reflectors and markers that could act as tracking points for the software. And even then a LOT of frame by frame adjustment is necessary.

    If i understand your problem correctly - You are actually looking at 30 mins worth of frame by frame animation i'm afraid.

    :(

  4. #4

    Default already existing SW

    Hi: Thanks for answering me. Nevertheless, I think nowadays there have to be better ways.
    In the article:
    http://wuc.kaist.ac.kr/publication/proceed_int/solee01/VSMM2001.pdf
    you can read about "Superimposing 3D Human Face on Motion Picture,"
    which was set up in a box in a fair.
    True, it's just the face, but I think if that's on the country-fair-booth level, then someone already went one step more, superimposing the figure.

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    Read again section 2.2.3. In particular reflect upon "Unfortunately, we did not find optimal method for our system since they require for front viewing
    face image for initializing and does not support rapid or wide-angle head motion"
    and thus they had to develop their own movement capture database (my highlighting)
    "For manual approach, we made
    the GUI based SIDB constructing program named SIEtool as shown in Figure 2. With the SIEtool,
    user can set face and light information per frame using GUI. In fact, though carefully designed
    functionality such as initial face position setting, key-frame interpolating, and frame copy/paste,
    are supported in the SIEtool, it is somewhat labor-intensive work to make the SIDB of long time
    motion picture
    . To alleviate hand job, semi-automatic approach will be combined into the SIEtool
    soon."

    So, whilst it may be possible to map an image onto a segment of a film in time enough to make it work in a kiosk, clearly the work involved in creating the model in the first place is done behind the scenes and is laborious.

    (I don't want to give too much thought to "alleviating hand jobs" though
    Tim

  6. #6

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    Perhaps..
    A program like "Poser" (Poser 3D Software - Official Website) could be used to generate moving CGI characters and set the appropriate lighting and camera positions, and can use existing video footage as a 'background' to a scene. To some extend it can handle BHV (Biovision format) files; which ThurstonLang referred to. Or, it may be as easy to pose the characters at points in the timeline and allow the software to automatically create all the movements between the points.

  7. #7

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    As much as I know, it was done by giving an input to the beginning frame of a sequence, and the software would remake the whole sequence
    It's not that simple I'm afraid, you don't need to do evey frame, but it's never quite that straight forward. To be able to replace video characters with CGI characters, or even add any CGI to video (characters/buildings etc.) isn't something you can learn to do over night.

    You'll need to learn:

    3d character modeling/texturing
    3d character rigging
    3d character animation
    3d lighting for compositing
    2d and 3d motion tracking
    and 2d compositing

    Normally this is done by a team, but recently and gradually there is becoming the need/desire to do a bit of everything, and even if part of a chain, it makes a massive difference to understand the other parts.

    David.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SEJedi View Post
    NOTE I've tried several video forums, but got stupid replies like do each frame with photoshop. With a 30-min video it's almost 50,000 images. It seems some people don't realize the difference between still image and video editing.
    There's very little difference between the two. A video is a series of images placed one after the other. Most effects work by applying the same settings to each frame. If you want to apply a different effect over time, you have to apply a different effect to different frames or key frames. You can automate this process to a certain degree by using markers, but the advice given is quite correct.

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