Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: The Great Director

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Surrey, UK
    Posts
    10,847
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default The Great Director

    Well, it ended up more of a tribute than an out and out comedy, but it was great fun to make (at least for those who only had to turn up on the day of the shoot).

    Background: Our Club (Staines Ciné & Video Society - Homepage) enters a variety of competitions but we never seem to have enough films for "fiction". I said if anyone had an idea, I'd gladly write the screenplay & direct. It didn't quite work out like that. Graham had the idea and (understandably) wanted to direct and fobbed me off with all the fun of producing (ie organising the right people to be in the right place at the right time. Fortunately I was well supported by people who would just sort out the props and costumes etc without me having to ask twice. And oh yes, he got me to play the lead.

    Criticise all you like but not the aluminium front door location. We thought we'd get away with it - how wrong we were!

    Oh, by the way it got three stars at BIAFF
    Last edited by TimStannard; 04-09-2011 at 02:23 PM.
    Tim

  2. #2

    Default

    Fabulous Tim. Very entertaining. Great props and costumes. Very funny, great little touches, well put togeter. AND gratuitous bosom shots. What more could you ask for.

    Well done to all the team.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Southend-on-sea
    Posts
    163

    Default

    I enjoyed that, it looks like a lot of work went into that and it did look like fun. Hope you do well with it. The costumes were great, locations weren't very believable, but it didn't bother me or detract from it at all.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Surrey, UK
    Posts
    10,847
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Thanks Midnight - really glad you found it entertaining. It's had a bit of a mixed reception so i know it doesn't appeal to everyone.
    Tim

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Surrey, UK
    Posts
    10,847
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by martchap View Post
    I enjoyed that
    Thanks for watching and commenting Martin. Sorry we crossposted before so I didn't spot your comment.
    Tim

  6. #6

    Default

    Thanks. I am glad I watched it. An admirable example of the benefits of harnessing people with different talents; and some lovely video effects.
    In another thread, I think TimS mentioned some work he had done at making video look 'old'. I am pleased his method of making it look authentic did not go as far as adding lots of ugly film grain.
    I am curious about the frame rate. Has the occasional frame been removed (or duplicated) to give the authentic jerkiness (uneven velocitys) in the Actors' s movements; or was it all down to their acting skills. I have no idea what frame rate those cameras used to have; but I assume they may have been very low. Or did it look jerky because I imagined it was?

    I recently commented on a 'User Video' by a chap doing a music video. The band members lacked acting talent and the chap had little directing skills. I remember thinking, there must be someone with theatrical or performance skills who they should approach. TimS's production (and its story) are reminders that cinematography is a lot more than simply pointing a camera at something.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Surrey, UK
    Posts
    10,847
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TimAndrews View Post
    Thanks. I am glad I watched it. An admirable example of the benefits of harnessing people with different talents
    Praise indeed Tim.

    I think you politely avoided mentioning appropriate talents. Most of the acting "skills" (if you can call them that) where we had them come from amateur dramatics where one over empasises everything with body movements so that half-blind Lilly at the back of the hall has some idea what's going on. Fine for old-time silent movie, whether we could do the same for a modern TV production remains to be seen.

    Aside from that i'm glad our efforts were appreciated. Graham and I slogged over the script over many nights and many pints. Then we slogged over the edits for many nights and many pints. We're a bit disappointed with result (we anticipated a much better film than we ended up with - and this was nobody's fault but our own - the sceenplay simply wasn't good enough) but certain production values do show through and I think we produced an "OK" film.

    To answer your technical point about the "aged look" Tim:
    My trial runs were done all in Sony Vegas. I speeded up the film, crushed a lot of blacks, blew out the highlights and played with the speed. This is where the fun comes in.
    You ask about old frame rates. Well, the old cameras were hand cranked, so the key thing is that the frame rate isn't constant - hence the stuttering effect we tend to see. If you were watching an old film hand cranked you'd also see the image drift upwards and downwards on the screen. I got halfway towards this in Vegas by setting the resample rate - ie you can set the sample rate to 8fps rather than 25fps, which, if you look at it on the timeline means every third frame (from the original) is used. As the other two frames are abandoned, the frame that is kept is extended to last three frames. Next we speed the film up. I don't know why, but we always seem to see hand cranked films run through a mechanical device which runs too fast. I do wonder whether this is a case of what has become perceived as "the norm" rather than reality.
    By the time I'd added a little "jitter", graininess, hairs and "flicker" using Vegas's built in old film look it looked pretty convincing.

    Unfortunately it was never to be like that!

    Graham edited the film in Final Cut Express with the intention that I'd add the aged look in post.

    However, because of timing, Graham really needed to speed up the film first (he also took it to black and white to help him get a "feel" for it).

    Thus I was presented with a film in a realy clean B&W already speeded up. Believe it or not most of that film is speeded up by a factor of two, there were a few scenes with a slightly lower increase, yet to my eyes it doesn't look so ridiculously fast. So I had to rethink my "aging". In the end, after playing with teh Sony Vegas Aged look plus colour curves etc I ended up using a combination of these plus FX from NewBlue. I apologise that I can't be more specific, but I've since transferred to a new PC and installation of Vegas and the NewBlue FX I used was trial version!

    All I can say is that default settings are great if you want to include some "old" film is another movie, but if you want an audience to sit through 5mins plus, you need to seriously ease back on all the parameters or they will get restless very soon. You are quite right Tim - don't go overboard with lots of ugly film grain etc - the audience will soon tire.

    And the other thing is - old films aren't sepia!
    Last edited by TimStannard; 04-11-2011 at 09:11 PM.
    Tim

  8. #8

    Default

    the sceenplay simply wasn't good enough
    Don't sell yourself short Tim, I think there were some really funny moment in it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Surrey, UK
    Posts
    10,847
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Midnight Blue View Post
    Don't sell yourself short Tim, I think there were some really funny moment in it.
    I suppose it's a question of perception.When we were writing it, it seemed much funnier Where it's een shown it produces wry grins rather than belly laughs (which I'm happy with - at least no-one's walked out yet)
    Tim

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kings Lynn. UK
    Posts
    213

    Default

    I had a real chuckle at that one. Good to see that it was done faithfully to how I remember it used to be done . Excellent.

Similar Threads

  1. Looking for a director
    By searchdirector in forum The Job Market
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-01-2010, 05:19 AM
  2. Power Director 6 Help
    By 1960darrenh in forum General video editing software help and advice
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-24-2008, 02:36 PM
  3. Power director
    By bondeno in forum General video editing software help and advice
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-04-2007, 11:54 PM
  4. Need some help with Power Director 4...
    By cubbiechris in forum General video editing software help and advice
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 03-24-2005, 04:40 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •