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Thread: Shooting for computer viewing

  1. #1
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    Smile Shooting for computer viewing

    Hello, I am new to the forum and to video editing. Shooting and editing training videos became a part of my job and I am lost. I apologize if my questions are all over the place.

    The tools I have are a Panasonic HDC-SD100 to record and Adobe Premiere Pro CS4 to edit. My first set of questions is with the camera. I know progressive is preferred over interlaced because of the comb effect...this is preferable for me because the finished videos will be paused and played in slow motion. The recording settings on the camera are HA1920, HG1920, HX1920, and HE1440, but the user manual never says what the HA, HG, etc. stand for. The manual says HA1920 is the maximum quality, and I read on the internet that the default is 60i. However, if I turn on the 24p Digital Cinema mode, it changes to 24p?

    When I edit video, I assume the Adobe Premiere preset I choose should be the same as the camera settings. If I shot in HA1920 with 24p, then I should look in the AVCHD folder and choose the 1080p24 preset?

    Finally, would the HD capabilities of the camera be lost on a computer monitor that is not HD-ready? If so, what other things should I consider in order to produce the best possible video quality? Thank you in advance. Any help is appreciated.

  2. #2

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    If I was you I'd shot the video with the highest quality, HA1920, camera settings at 60i this will make the slow mo better. Set your project properties to match your footage ie 1080-60i. When you render out the footage render as 1080-30p so the software deinterlaces the video.

    All computer screens are "HD-ready", unless someone has a monitor from the 1980s.

    Hope this helps.

  3. #3
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    That does help... a lot, thank you. About the HD thing, I guess I thought computer monitors and televisions were similar.
    I wasn't positive about the 24p mode because it made the color a little weird. When you say render, that is after I've edited and I am exporting to Media Encoder to change the mts to avi or mpeg2?

  4. #4

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    Why do you need to use media Encoder ? You can use Vegas to render (make the video after editing) into any format you want. ie If your making a DVD mpeg2 BUT if it's for computer viewing just keep it in the original format you shot it in ie mts format and you keep the HD quality.

  5. #5

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    Adobe Premiere Pro CS4 to edit
    CS4 is fuul of bugs tha were never fully resolved. If you can afford it, CS5 is much better. Or go back to CS3 which was a great version.

    Set
    your project properties to match your footage ie 1080-60i. When you render out the footage render as 1080-30p so the software deinterlaces the video.
    I don't think any video editor app converts to progressive frames very well, especially Premiere. Much better to shoot progressive in camera or use a software like Magic Bullet that does a great progressive conversion.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Midnight Blue View Post
    Why do you need to use media Encoder ? You can use Vegas to render (make the video after editing) into any format you want. ie If your making a DVD mpeg2 BUT if it's for computer viewing just keep it in the original format you shot it in ie mts format and you keep the HD quality.
    Premiere just opens Media Encoder automatically when I choose Export Media. I was equipped with the Adobe suite, but I was told that the training computers in the facility have a very basic setup and can only view avi or wmv movies. I think I was mistaken about the mpeg2...so if I can only export as avi or wmv, the quality is reduced? But in order to render at 1920x1080, I must choose to export as wmv; in that pulldown menu I chose HDTV 1080p 24 High Quality, but there is also HDTV 1080p 25 High Quality. The choices for avi are all 720x480...that means 720p?

    Quote Originally Posted by Swoopie View Post
    CS4 is fuul of bugs tha were never fully resolved. If you can afford it, CS5 is much better. Or go back to CS3 which was a great version.

    Set

    I don't think any video editor app converts to progressive frames very well, especially Premiere. Much better to shoot progressive in camera or use a software like Magic Bullet that does a great progressive conversion.
    I think my boss wants to upgrade to CS5, but there is no room in the budget for it right now. I guess if I use the 24p mode and it does strange things with the color, I should familiarize myself with the color correction?

  7. #7

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    If you're getting cinematones with 24P, different cams use different color curves, but generally cinematones makes the color a little more saturated and does things with the gamma and light settings that tend to make things look richer. Almost everyone prefers cinematones if it's available. If yours is doing actually changing the colors then it might need servicing.

    Media Encoder is one of the best mpg encoders out there. Not quite up there with TMPGEnc, but quite good nonetheless.

    Chances are that the computers viewing the files will be able to view mpg just fine, but possibly not HD. They also may not be able to view HD in wmv format unless they have a fairly recent media player installed. It's all about the media player.

    I chose HDTV 1080p 24 High Quality, but there is also HDTV 1080p 25 High Quality
    In America and some other countries we use 24P for film work, so if you plan to have your video transfered to film for a theatrical viewing, this is the way to go. 25P is what most of Europe uses for both film and television. Choose your country....

    The choices for avi are all 720x480...that means 720p?
    No, 720 is in reference to frame size, and this form of AVI is DV-AVI (what miniDV cams shoot).

    Depending on the size of the monitors those compters are using in the training facility, HD may not be useful. My personal rule of thumb would be that any screen 17" or smaller won't see much benefit from HD. SD is tremendously faster to edit than HD, so if you can go SD it might be better all around.

  8. #8
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    Thank you, this helps me understand things bit by bit. My boss has been stressing that the videos should be HD because the camera itself shoots HD. He doesn't think the videos that have been compiled so far are HD-quality. I doubt the training computers have up to date software, so I will try some trial and error with exporting an avi, a wmv, and an mpeg to see if there is a difference in quality and then go from there.

  9. #9

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    I bet I could show your boss footage that is SD and he would think it was HD and HD footage that he would think was SD. Remember the key to image quality when rendering is setting a high bit rate. Example normal SD DVDs are around 8-9Mb per second, HD footage is between 18-25 Mb per second.

    From what you have said so far I am wondering if some of the problem is the quality of the filming. I don't know how good you are with a camera but if you shot things with enough light and the correct exposure, even with auto focus, you should get decent footage with your camera. The software, editing and rendering is the last point in a chain of events. Starting with planning, then shooting, so if you haven't done the first steps properly you will be disappointed at the editing stage. Just a thought and please don't think I being insulting about your camera work it's just that it is an important part of the process.

  10. #10
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    I think you're right. Still pictures are my forte...when they start moving, I'm out of my league. I've been filming here and there over the past few weeks. A lot more goes into this than I think my boss realizes, but I've learned so much reading through the forum and getting out there and experimenting. Once I crack all of Adobe Premiere Pro's mysteries, I think I will be able to produce something passable as a glorified home movie! Thank you.

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