Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: me and my .....

  1. #1

    Default me and my .....

    I have a series of short film projcts in the pipeline the theme of which will be, Me And My .....

    The "series" entails short (approx 2 minuet) pieces where the talent talk's about something that is dear to them. I'm thinking 2 cameras, one tripod mounted fixed on head and one hand held ? roaming camera. For audio I'll be using a lavalier mic plugged directly in to to the camera.

    my question is, for the main fixed camera should the talent be looking directly into the camera or as is usual when someone is being interviewed at a three quarter angle ?
    bare in mind this is not being shot as a question and answer documentary the talent's voice will be the only voice heard and will be just "talking" about the subject matter.

    First one is planned for tomorrow (weather permitting) and features a mate talking about is VW camper van wish me luck

  2. #2

    Default

    Good luck with the series, I like the idea. The more natural and relaxed you can get your subject the better but I'm sure you already know that. As to where they should look that depends on the effect you want to create. If the person is comfortable looking directly into the lens, I think this can give a more intimate communication. BUT ultimately it depends on the talent and how they are in front of the camera. I'd just go for what ever they are comfortable with rather than trying to get them to do something they feel uncomfortable with, the camera will pick this up.

    Just remember you are capturing their soul for eternity.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    A difficulty with normal people (ie not TV professionals) looking into camera in close-up is that, after a while, their eyes will wander. They will start by looking directly down the tube, then look at the lens hood, maybe glance at the camera operator, then look at the right side of the lens, then the left side etc. etc. This can make them look a bit shifty.

    The best way to get over this is to have the camera a bit further away on a longer lens.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Midnight Blue View Post

    Just remember you are capturing their soul for eternity.
    do you think its a good idea to mention this just before i click record ? err, probably not

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rembrandt Rob View Post
    A difficulty with normal people (ie not TV professionals) looking into camera in close-up is that, after a while, their eyes will wander. They will start by looking directly down the tube, then look at the lens hood, maybe glance at the camera operator, then look at the right side of the lens, then the left side etc. etc. This can make them look a bit shifty.

    The best way to get over this is to have the camera a bit further away on a longer lens.
    good advice rob

  6. #6

    Default

    Any advice for the height of the cam (eg mouth level, or eye level) or the area of the face best to appear in the middle of the picture? (I seem to recall a 'trick' when being photographed (head+shoulders) is for the talent to lean forward a little, but I have no recollection why).

  7. #7

    Default

    Isn't it to show off the cleavage.

  8. #8

    Default

    If you have the camera higher than their eye level it can look more flatering as it helps to cut out shadows and features under noses and chins. This works particularly well shooting vox pops when you have very little control over lighting and make up. If you have control over these factors then it can be more of a specific subject to subject basis.

    As for framing if you have them talking to a subject off screen you need to leave talking room to that side. If they are talking to camera I think it's good to have them off centre, but not as much as you would leave talking room. A little bit of study of news type programs will show what framing options you have, and what works well.

    Another advantage to shooting further back is that the longer lens setting is more flattering to facial features. Getting close you need a wider lens angle which flattens out the image, particularly as it mores away from the centre, i.e. how extra wide fish eye lenes work.

    Portrait photographers, for years, have favoured a 105mm lens for portrait shooting. If you can get your camera distance and zoom to the equivalent it would be ideal.

    Cleavage issues speak for themselves.

    David.

  9. #9

    Default

    If you have the camera higher than their eye level it can look more flatering as it helps to cut out shadows and features under noses and chins.
    Just what I was going to say. Keeping the cam level, raise it till it's level with their forehead while zoomed in, and then back out and tip the cam forward until you have their full face. Also, overlighting them and then using filters to bring down the light results in less wrinkles. It helps to have the lights a little higher than head level too. But I'd certainly have them look into the cam.

  10. #10

    Default

    Bit of a mixed bag really. I s'pose the first rule should be know your equipment ..... one of the cameras ive had only a short while and it was a bit of a wrestle really. I know, poor craftsman blames his tools etc .....

    The location we chose turned out to be closed on Mondays off season so we ended up in a muddy lay bay a couple of miles away.... hardly ideal.
    The temperature was around 3 degrees and the talent wasn't suitably attired for such conditions ... hardly ideal.


    I forgot to set the second camera to record in 1080 so i have a mixture of 1080 and 720 footage hardy ideal .... can you see a pattern forming here ?

    The lavalier mic worked well perhaps a little too well as it picked up my laughing in the background on a couple of occasions.
    So, i have some great sound bites and a bit of OK footage.

    Because of the near freezing temp and crappy location the whole thing was rushed and TBH it shows.

    Will probably re-shoot the whole thing.

    * as an aside fortunately the subject matter was a VW camper van so at least we had the facilities to brew up
    Last edited by enc; 12-13-2010 at 08:50 PM.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •