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Thread: Stepping up to HD

  1. #1

    Default Stepping up to HD

    Am about to step up from standard format and was looking at HD camcorders when I realised that such a move will probably trigger upgrade requirements elsewhere. So with that in mind, in order to make the transition I believe I will need

    HD camcorder
    PC capable of handling HD video
    HD Editing Software

    Setting aside the camcorder I am assuming that minimum spec PC will need
    64 bit architecture
    8MB RAM
    Decent graphics card
    Dual Core Processor
    500 gig sata HD
    Blu Ray Burner


    Editing Software I intend to use is latest version Prem Elements (is this OK)

    Am I missing anything ? Any comments, alternative options ?

    Bottom line is that I am a keen amateur that wants to shoot burn and watch HD film on my blu ray video

    Thx Rich
    Dell Dual Core Pentium 3 GB Ram 500 GB (7200 rpm) SATA Drive 128 MB ATI Radeon Graphics (TV out & DVI) 16x DVD+/-RW Dual layer

  2. #2

    Default

    I would recommend a quad core processor for your PC. You will also find that only having a 500Gb HD will soon get filled up. It is best to have a system that has at least 2 drives. One for the OS (operating System (Windows) and programs and one for the media. This would be the most basic system for HD editing.

    The editing software is a personal choice. I use Sony Vegas Pro 9.
    Last edited by Midnight Blue; 12-02-2010 at 12:31 PM.

  3. #3

    Default

    OK thx - with regard to seperating the OS from the media, am I right in saying that I house the OS and all other applications on Drive A and Prem Elements plus all video footage on Drive B
    Dell Dual Core Pentium 3 GB Ram 500 GB (7200 rpm) SATA Drive 128 MB ATI Radeon Graphics (TV out & DVI) 16x DVD+/-RW Dual layer

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rpwall View Post
    OK thx - with regard to seperating the OS from the media, am I right in saying that I house the OS and all other applications on Drive A and Prem Elements plus all video footage on Drive B
    No, the idea is to have the media on a different drive to everything else.

  5. #5

    Default

    Decent graphics card
    The one that comes built-in to the MOBO is generally good enough unless you want to do a lot with 3D or want to run dual monitors.

  6. #6

    Default

    One final point - I work with Prem Elements because ive always worked with it ,so I know it well - That said, these days its slow and prone to crashes, something that reviewers of the latest PE9 have pointed out --- All subjective i know , but is there a better option out there that doesn't cost a squillion quid ? No bells or whistles, I need reliability and ease of use

    Thx R
    Dell Dual Core Pentium 3 GB Ram 500 GB (7200 rpm) SATA Drive 128 MB ATI Radeon Graphics (TV out & DVI) 16x DVD+/-RW Dual layer

  7. #7
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    Default

    I edit on Final Cut, but for the PC the feedback I get is that Sony Vegas is good, or Pinnacle, although I have no idea how much these programs cost. As pointed out, you'll need 2 drives minimum, preferably internal drives and as large as possible. Your Boot drive will hold the program and the relatively small project files and then your 2nd drive will hold the large media files. Also make sure you have a nice graphics card NVidia do it for me every time.

    Also make sure your PC has esata external connections so that you can get an external sata drive as having somewhere to archive your old projects is important and you want it to be quick so that you can archive large volumes quickly.

    Video Production Services Company UK London

  8. #8

    Default

    One for the OS (operating System (Windows) and programs and one for the media.
    Do you really think you see any difference from this? I do more audio work than video, but most of the guys I know using DAWS quit doing the two drive thing (along with partitioning) years ago. Most of us just have an external drive to back up on, but just one internal now with everything on it. I'm sure it couldn't hurt; I'm just wondering if it's really all that beneficial these days considering the speed of hard drives with large cache sizes now.

  9. #9
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    Well I suppose it depends on what you're doing and what you're doing it with. For instance using editing HD footage, using Final Cut it's essential; that's not to say if you only have one drive it won't work, but it will just work smoother the more transitions, titles, effects etc. that you add to your timeline.

    Also if you use the full Final Cut Studio package (or say After Effects with Avid) then you'll come to a point whereby you want to take stuff into Color and Motion and you'll really notice (or maybe you wont' because you've got nothing to reference it against) your computer labouring to complete the task. Like I said in most cases everything will still work, it will just take a lot longer.

    But for instance on a music video that I worked on I ingested some XDCAM footage edited and then took the sequence over to Color for grading, after quite a complicated grade I sent it back to FCP and the timeline just refused to play anywhere near smoothly and was impossible to work with. This was because even though my Final Cut media was on my 2nd drive, I had left the default setting for Color and left the media on my boot drive, I moved it and voila, everything was fine.

    I think that whatever software and hardware you use, it's always a good idea to leave your boot drive as empty as possible, as this will improve the speed and efficiency of your computer, this is easily demonstrated by comparing a laptop's speed when you first bought it and a year later when it's clogged with programs and cookies and such. You might think well I'm doing more audio work so it doesn't matter, but it might; depending on how complex the work you do is and it's always best to future proof yourself as much as possible.

    For instance I wish when I was setting myself up I had spent the extra 4 or 500 quid to get an 8 core instead of a quad core and an extra 200 or so on 3 internal 1TB drives instead of a 320 and a 1TB, it would have hurt, but I could have afforded it and I'd be better of for it now.

    Video Production Services Company UK London

  10. #10

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    dariv,

    I might have to give it a try then. But why internal drives instead an external for the video files? I mean considering they're all pretty much working off SATA connections on the MOBO these days whether they're in the box or out.

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