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Thread: Do you need a good video card to use Sony Vegas Pro properly?

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    Default Do you need a good video card to use Sony Vegas Pro properly?

    Do you need a good video card to use Sony Vegas Pro properly?

    Basically we are fed up with the crappy onboard audio we have, & tried to install a dedicated audio soundcard in our PC only to find this huge videocard cooling thing blocking access to the remaining PCI slot. The only thing we can think of is replacing the videocard with a spare one we have to make more room.
    It's older & not so good but all we do on this pc is edit videos with Vegas

    Thanks

    Sarah

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    The biggest (or should that be smallest) bottleneck on any system is most likely to be the CPU (the brains of the PC that does most of the thinking). Although a lot of tasks are outsourced to other parts, such as the graphics card and the audio card, it's the CPU that will ultimately limit the power of the other parts. With that in mind, it might be an idea to consider buying a new PC if it's older than a few years old.

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    The pc is a quadcore just over a year old & out of warranty, so at last we can upgrade the audio by putting in a proper soundcard.
    In case I didnt make myself clear, what I'm asking is do we need a good video card to use Sony Vegas Pro properly or is a good video card redundant for video editing purposes?
    So we can put in an older physically smaller videocard to free up space so we can fit the soundcard in the obstructed PCI slot.

    Sarah

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    Taken from a Sony press release (Tuesday, June 08, 2010)

    GPU-accelerated AVC Rendering: Vegas Movie Studio HD Platinum (10) can now use the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) in equipped computers to improve AVC rendering performance and speed, which allows final projects to be published faster than ever before. Users with a CUDA-enabled NVIDIA® video card are able to encode to the Sony AVC format using GPU-accelerated rendering.
    I wouldn't suggest that there would be an issue with using a less "powerful" graphics card. However, it''s possible that you could get a CUDA enable card which is physically smaller whilst providing you with the same power. It might be worth posting your graphics card specs on one of those uber geeky techy forums (Overclockers UK Forums - Powered by vBulletin is a good one). These guys will go out of their way to provide an alternative which is smaller and just as powerful.

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    It is highly likely you'll see no benefit at all. Until version 10 all vegas stuff was done in the CPU. Read what Marc has said: Version 10 (quoted here for Movie Studio Platinum but this is also the case with Vegas Pro) has a very specific ability to use a CUDA enabled card - that is it will only use it for encoding using the Sony AVC codec. This may or may not be significant for you.

    But, if you check out the Sony forum, you'll find that most people seem to be suggesting in practice that whilst this can help out an older machine, if you have a faster CPU, turning on the GPU accellerated rendering was actually slower. At least, that's what I gleaned a couple of weeks ago when I was browsing.
    Tim

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarah & Allison View Post
    The only thing we can think of is replacing the videocard with a spare one we have to make more room.
    Apologies Sarah, I completely overlooked this bit. Yes, go ahead and try this out!

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    GPU accelerated rendering is in it's infancy, and it's also a new thing to me, so nothing definitive on that here. From my research it seems that GPU rendering can be slower but can also be doing a better job. I can't say specifically related to vegas as I don't use it, so while this is a possibility, it isn't necessarily the case.

    I just wanted to point out the one thing that stood out to me in relation to this. The CPU passes work to the GPU and it can only do it as fast as the CPU is capable so if you do go for a cuda enabled card, the best possible card isn't always the best for a articular system as it will only perform as good as the CPU allows it to perform.

    I don't think this is the issue Tim mentions as he relates to faster CPU's. But perhaps the CPU is waisted on passing information it could process it'self faster. It could be related to the first issue I mentioned and if so in my opinion that's a good thing, or it could just be programing in the software that is yet to mature, but on that I couldn't know for sure. A Vegas techy would be able to answer better.

    As for your issue straight off, if your software isn't using cuda, and your card isn't providing it, then changing card shouldn't affect your rendering. Display issues would be your only concern, but assuming it's a compatible card and reasonably modern you should probably be ok. You may want to check opengl capabilities of both cards and if any of the software you use utilises the opengl before changing.

    David.

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    Ok thanks Marc & Tim & David, we will try this older, less bulky card we have.
    My husband bought it 2/3 years ago to start playing pc video games again so it must be quite good.

    Sarah

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    If you use the "stereoscopic 3D media" editing features, a beefy external card with lots of onboard RAM will certainly help there. I don't suspect that's many people though.

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