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Thread: Night Filming or Daytime with Night Effect

  1. #1
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    Oct 2010
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    Lightbulb Night Filming or Daytime with Night Effect

    Hello,

    I'm looking to make a video that's filmed mostly in the dark outside. I was wondering if it would be better to film in the night and how I could tweak my camera to do that. Or if I should film in the day and add some effects to make it look night, and how could I do that also. I'm Editing using Sony Vegas Pro 9.0 and my camera a Panasonic HDC-SD20 recording AVCHD and sound is Dolby Digital 5.1 Creator. This is going to be my first short film and any tips for best quality video and sound would be greatly appreciated. I have the bare minimum for equipment and a low budget.

    Any and all help is greatly Appreciated.


    --PicNickTime

  2. #2

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    Personally I don't like day for night shooting. It never really looks convincing to me. There may be others that disagree. I suppose it depends on the look you want. I would go out into the night and do some test shots making note of your cameras settings so you can see for yourself how your camera performs under what settings. The first "proper" video I shot was mostly outside at night. You will probably need some form of lighting. I used normal work lights but have found they are far from ideal, they get hotter than the sun ! but do the job at a very cheap price.

    I have found YouTube tutorials very useful for learning about lighting and other techniques. Good luck with your shoot.

  3. #3
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    I could do the work lights but I'll be filming in the woods so my only power source would be a generator and then I have the problem of noise. I'll take my camera out tonight and do some tests. Maybe the moon will be good enough lighting

  4. #4

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    I can see how filming in woods would be a problem. This might turn out to be a good location for day for night filming. Yes, I know what I said earlier but if it's thick woods this would hide the sky which is a big problem for day for night filming and there wouldn't be shadows . Keep your camera angles so that you don't have sky in it and you should be able to shoot during the day, which will be a lot easier for you. You can adjust the picture in post. BUT like I said earlier do some testing first.

  5. #5
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    Alright thanks a lot. I'll have to mix it up and do some day for night and just some night filming. Parts will be at a lake so that will have to be done in the night. I'll do some tests and mix it up a bit. Thanks again.

  6. #6

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    Hi there, I have find out that maby Rotolight can solv the lighting, just Google "Rotolight"

  7. #7
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    Rotolight is a LED light which fits onto the microphone holder of a camcorder. It is nothing more than an expensive led on-camera light, nothing to do with day-for-night.

    Also, the LEDs are not particularly video-friendly in that their CRI (Colour Rendition Index) is quite poor compared to other headlights in the same price range.

  8. #8
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    Have a look on ebay for " 96 led" in the photography section. These are very cheap leds which are just as good as the $300 Rotolights. You can find them at prices ranging from $30 to $200, go for the $30 versions because they are all identical, made by the same company, with the same components. There are 96 led, 126 and 160 versions. This refers to the number of leds there are in the unit and they get more expensive the more leds there are. Personally I would get a couple of 96 units for your filming in the woods as you don't want too much light when you're working in dark locations and can't light the whole forest.
    They work on AA batteries and a set of batteries lasts for at least four hours continuous use.

    Their light is a fair bit away from ideal but with a bit of gel and frost you can get quite a decent look.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Ok thanks I'll look into that. If anything I'll modify them if they don't quite do what I want. Any other ideas I'd be glad to hear them and I'll let you guys know what ones worked best. Thanks again.

    --
    PicNickTime

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