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Thread: lighting for interview?

  1. #1
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    Default lighting for interview?

    i know nothing when it comes to proper lighting techniques when filming... other than the fact that it makes all the difference in the world.

    i've got some interviews coming up, and i'm wondering what type of lights/lighting should i be looking into to make it look as professional as possible... is hard white what i want? or soft? at what angles?? haha im lost..

    thanks for all the help everyone has been giving me around her btw, i've been learning lots and am looking forward to showing you some finished products in the future!

  2. #2
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    Much though I hate Wikipedia (often a source of mis-information) I suggest you have a glance at...

    Three-point lighting - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    This is the basis for lighting most common interview situations. Soft lighting is less critical on the positioning and often more flattering to the interviewee, hard lighting produces the most dramatic effects.

  3. #3

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    Follow the advice from Gaffer. The type of interview you are doing should determine the lighting type. ie for an intimate feel keep the background light low. I presume this is for the girls group project you posted in another thread. If I was doing it I would keep the same flavor or style for the interviews as the rest of piece you are doing.

    One thing to remember is to make sure the background is appropriate with the subject. Don't sit the girls in an armchair in front of a log fire. If it's all about urban keep it urban.

  4. #4
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    thanks that article helped me out a lot! any specific wattage one would suggest to film such a thing???

  5. #5
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    Wattage means nothing. Compare a 500w tungsten, with an HMI and fluorescent and you'll get three different levels for the same wattage.

    It all depends on what you want to do. If you're filming in a dark nightclub, a domestic lightbulb will suffice to make your subject stand out from the background, in bright sunlight a 4 kilowatt will be struggling.

    It's all about ratios, not power. In sunlight a reflector will give you more light than any electrical source which you're likely to get your hands on. Lighting is a field where you can learn the basics in a day, then spend a lifetime fine-tuning it.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Gaffer View Post
    Lighting is a field where you can learn the basics in a day, then spend a lifetime fine-tuning it.
    Amen Brother.

  7. #7

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    Depends how you want your interview to look.
    Not all interview are the same so you will need an array of lights.
    I've done interviews with one key light and softbox with reflector fill and used a ceiling light as a hair light and a lamp in the background.

    Ive also used 5 lights ( floods and fresnels) for others.

    It's a craft so experiment as much as you can.

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