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Thread: Screen arrangement

  1. #1

    Default Screen arrangement

    Possible to encode video so it's not full screen? And will that give you better quality if what you have is mediocre quality. TMPGEng has a function for this but it's ambiguous. How do you calculate the size if you don't want full screen?

  2. #2
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    Possible to encode video so it's not full screen?
    Video resolution follows a set standard according to the area of the world in which you are located. In order to ensure your video plays on your TV (i.e in your DVD player) you need to adhere to these standards. For example here in the UK, a PAL DVD has a video resolution of 720 x 576. There are subsets to this standard (VCD is part of the DVD standard), but again these follow an agreed standard for guaranteed playback.

    Playback on PCs is a different matter altogether. It doesn't matter what resolution you use to play back, but it's best to stick to multiples of the orginal in order to maintain the aspect ratio. Note here that in order to achieve the desired aspect ratio you can either change the frame dimensions and change the pixel aspect ratio (for example anamorphic DVDs have a widescreen pixel aspect ratio, but full screen dimensions so that the pixels are actually "stretched" on playback to get the "black bars".

    Further more, a monitor aspect ratio is different to PAL or NTSC aspect ratios. That's why on playback, a full screen PAL video will not fill the entire screen (there will be thin black bars at the top and bottom).

    However, no matter what dimensions you choose, PC playback software can expand the video keeping the pixel aspect ratio intact. This may manifest in encoded black bars (you'll notice they are ligheter than the bigger black bars if you turn up the brightness), distorted playback, or the software may force a theoritcal resolution change (much like when SVCDs are played back on TVs).

    So, in answer to your first question, you can encode video at any resolution as long as you want to playback on a PC only. You can then playback footage in a window (but then you can resize the window to ant size you want, and monitor resolutions can take many different forms, so your question is irrelevant).

    Another spin on your question is that you want your video to be surround by black screen. This should be done in editing by changing the size of your video using Picture in Picture (PIP) methods.

    And will that give you better quality if what you have is mediocre quality.
    Nothing. You can't improve the quality of digital video. At least you can't without adding a filter which will reduce clarity.

    How do you calculate the size if you don't want full screen?
    How big do you want your video? What exactly do you mean by "full screen"?

  3. #3

    Default

    Thanks Marc. I wanted to play it on a DVD. When I play clips in a very small preview pane in some of my video software (TMPGEnc) the quality is extremely better than on a larger (media) screen (Realplayer, VLC, etc.). (These are clips that are maybe 480x360 or less). I thought maybe the playback size and video quality were somehow proportional. You should sticky some editing books here, I see nothing on the net. That would be helpful. I have taken physics, math, engineering years ago but this stuff has my head spinning.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by rjc7394
    Thanks Marc. I wanted to play it on a DVD. When I play clips in a very small preview pane in some of my video software (TMPGEnc) the quality is extremely better than on a larger (media) screen (Realplayer, VLC, etc.). (These are clips that are maybe 480x360 or less). I thought maybe the playback size and video quality were somehow proportional. You should sticky some editing books here, I see nothing on the net. That would be helpful. I have taken physics, math, engineering years ago but this stuff has my head spinning.
    Yes, the playback size is proportinate to the quality. Quality in video is made up of 3 things:

    1) the resolution of the image - the higher the resolution, the greater the detail. If you expand a low resolution image (say 360 x 288 pixels) to fill a screen made up of say 2 times those pixels, you can see that there will be a reduction in quality. If you leave it windowed at that size, there won't be a reduction. That's why there's so much said about High Definition Video - one of the apsects is higher resolution, meaning sharper image quality even on large screens.

    2) the bitrate of the video - the higher the bitrate, the more data processed per second and the better the quality; this is closely related to

    3) the amount and type of compression - compression algorithms assess video and throw away data that's not required. This theoretically lowers the bitrate for any given quality and therefore lowers the need for high bitrates and file sizes.

    This is a very general answer. If you want to play your DVD with the best quality, use the standard resolution of 720*576 (480) at the maximum bitrate with two pass encoding.

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