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Thread: My beginner film - constructive criticism & feedback please

  1. #1
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    Smile My beginner film - constructive criticism & feedback please

    Hi all,

    I have put together short film featuring the plants and wildlife in my garden in Surrey, UK. I shot the video on my Panasonic AG-HMC41E and edited it in iMovieHD.

    I know I still have an awful lot to learn, so I would be grateful if you could take a look and leave some constructive criticism/ feedback / advice either on here or on Vimeo.

    Many thanks in advance.

    Mike



    [ame="http://vimeo.com/11573261"]English Country Garden on Vimeo[/ame]


    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-DnM6I75hdA"]YouTube- English country garden in spring[/ame]


    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_FHmeA5PpUY"]YouTube- English Country Garden v2[/ame]
    Last edited by MikeTV; 06-01-2010 at 06:33 PM.

  2. #2
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    Welcome Mike, nice film, hope you take the criticism in the way it's intended... constructively.

    Personally I think that the editing needs a bit of tightening up. On a few occasions in the first half, the shot was seen then the camera started to move and then CUT into the next shot. In this case I would either cut before the start of the camera move or let the camera finish, otherwise it leaves a feeling of frustration.

    The same happened with the cat, it sat there, fine, then started to move CUT! In my opinion you should have either have cut before the moggy moved or let it exit the frame, then cut. You've also got a bit of a habit of not letting the camera settle. You move a bit, then zoom a touch, then move a bit more, which can be a tad unsettling. Finally, there are a couple of zooms, on the cat and the fox, where you cut away a bit too early, instead of letting the shot develop.

    This sounds like a hatchet-job, it isn't meant to be. Let me put it this way: We get a lot of crap here and those are the ones which we can't be bothered to critique. The good stuff is worth spending time writing about.

    All in all I enjoyed it.

    Finally do you get as p*ssed off with those loud and obnoxious green parakeets as I do?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Gaffer View Post
    Welcome Mike, nice film, hope you take the criticism in the way it's intended... constructively.

    Personally I think that the editing needs a bit of tightening up. On a few occasions in the first half, the shot was seen then the camera started to move and then CUT into the next shot. In this case I would either cut before the start of the camera move or let the camera finish, otherwise it leaves a feeling of frustration.

    The same happened with the cat, it sat there, fine, then started to move CUT! In my opinion you should have either have cut before the moggy moved or let it exit the frame, then cut. You've also got a bit of a habit of not letting the camera settle. You move a bit, then zoom a touch, then move a bit more, which can be a tad unsettling. Finally, there are a couple of zooms, on the cat and the fox, where you cut away a bit too early, instead of letting the shot develop.

    This sounds like a hatchet-job, it isn't meant to be. Let me put it this way: We get a lot of crap here and those are the ones which we can't be bothered to critique. The good stuff is worth spending time writing about.

    All in all I enjoyed it.

    Finally do you get as p*ssed off with those loud and obnoxious green parakeets as I do?
    Thanks a million for taking the time to reply mate, much appreciated!

    I am totally happy to take on board any criticism mate because I am a novice and I love filming and editing already! I want to get better though, and you can't do that without learning.

    I hadn't really noticed the camera moving, CUT, thing until you pointed it out so thanks a lot for that. Something for me to focus on in the next video.

    With the fox though, it was gone as soon as I cut, so there was nothing left to see I'm afraid!

    Thanks again for your feedback mate, I really appreciate it.

    Mike

    p.s the birds tend to stay down the very end of the garden, so they don't really bother e to be fair!

  4. Default

    Nice work with your first video. Some real pretty shots in there.

    The best cut to me in the video was when the music's pace changed and you used the boy's arms raised with the music. That was nicely done.

    Aside from that, I felt some of your cuts were not smooth, and that's in large part what your filming.

    If your shooting something stationary with no movement at all, it is hard to make a smooth transition to your next frame without a pretty closely matching the previous shot composition wise.

    Likewise, when it's still, then a camera move, then a cut to a new stationary shot, that's also jarring.

    The bee on the flower was an extremely nice shot IMO. And the bee moving helped transition cuts to and from it.

    There was a section of flowers in the wind that cut smoothly, because of the similar movements. Matching up similar movements for cuts would help you think more about post when filming, and probably give a smoother final video.

    Overall, good job. Keep it up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jamiefranz View Post
    Nice work with your first video. Some real pretty shots in there.

    The best cut to me in the video was when the music's pace changed and you used the boy's arms raised with the music. That was nicely done.

    Aside from that, I felt some of your cuts were not smooth, and that's in large part what your filming.

    If your shooting something stationary with no movement at all, it is hard to make a smooth transition to your next frame without a pretty closely matching the previous shot composition wise.

    Likewise, when it's still, then a camera move, then a cut to a new stationary shot, that's also jarring.

    The bee on the flower was an extremely nice shot IMO. And the bee moving helped transition cuts to and from it.

    There was a section of flowers in the wind that cut smoothly, because of the similar movements. Matching up similar movements for cuts would help you think more about post when filming, and probably give a smoother final video.

    Overall, good job. Keep it up.

    Thanks for the feedback, Jamie, much appreciated.

    I'll deffo try and pay more attention to the order of the clips in my next video, and try and match movements etc

    Thanks again for your advice!

    Mike

  6. #6

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    I agree with the other posters except I would love to have parakeets in my garden and a "tame" fox. This piece reminds me very much of the sort of thing I produce a year or so ago. I still do some times but don't tell anyone on the forum.

    The only thing I feel I can add is that the cuts would be better if they were in time or on the beat of the music, which I thought was a good choice with the visuals.

    Loverly garden as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Midnight Blue View Post
    The only thing I feel I can add is that the cuts would be better if they were in time or on the beat of the music, which I thought was a good choice with the visuals.
    ....which would take some of the edge off the harshness of the custs as commented on by jamiefranz.

    Nothing to add constructively - the other guys have covered it all.

    I particularly liked the way the images really seemed to "pop" out when you went from an out-of-focus shot to in focus. How did you do that so quickly/accurately without overshooting? I think I'd cheat by starting in focus and going out and then reversing in the edit.

    The only reservation I'd have is, as an experimental piece it's fine, but if you were making this as a film for an audience - who is that audience?
    Tim

  8. #8

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    Not sure if the others have covered this, I can see some simple things to do as an improvement.

    Once you have your shot, record the video and don't move the camera, I see in your edits there are movements of camera just prior to a edit.
    It takes a fair bit of experience to pull nice rule of third frames, for some it comes naturally. Overall it's quite a nice peep into a spring garden.
    I know nothing about youtube, even less about video
    http://www.youtube.com/user/leokimvideo

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    Quote Originally Posted by Midnight Blue View Post
    I agree with the other posters except I would love to have parakeets in my garden and a "tame" fox. This piece reminds me very much of the sort of thing I produce a year or so ago. I still do some times but don't tell anyone on the forum.

    The only thing I feel I can add is that the cuts would be better if they were in time or on the beat of the music, which I thought was a good choice with the visuals.

    Loverly garden as well.

    Yeah we are really lucky with our garden mate! I think the 'tame' fox is more down to the wife feeding it so much, but the parakeet's are beautiful!

    I rushed the edit to be honest, and I agree that I need to take far more car in getting the cuts to change on the same beat each time ... next time I will.

    Thanks for the feedback, it's much appreciated.

    Cheers,

    Mike

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    Quote Originally Posted by TimStannard View Post
    ....which would take some of the edge off the harshness of the custs as commented on by jamiefranz.

    Nothing to add constructively - the other guys have covered it all.

    I particularly liked the way the images really seemed to "pop" out when you went from an out-of-focus shot to in focus. How did you do that so quickly/accurately without overshooting? I think I'd cheat by starting in focus and going out and then reversing in the edit.

    The only reservation I'd have is, as an experimental piece it's fine, but if you were making this as a film for an audience - who is that audience?

    Hi Tim,

    Thanks for the feedback. I think I rushed a bit too much through the edit, maybe to get it finished, but I totally agree with you that I need to take more care in getting the cuts to change with the beat of the track. Thanks for the advice.

    As for the focus thing, I simply put my camera on auto-focus and then use the manual focus ring to put the shot out of focus as I press record. The camera then auto-focuses, and the cuts you mentioned are the result.

    Thanks again for your feedback, much appreciated.

    Cheers,

    Mike

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