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Thread: Filming Wedding - What Camera? [Hire]

  1. Default Filming Wedding - What Camera? [Hire]

    Hi there,

    Doing a favour and filming friends wedding - haven't got my own camera, and so going to hire one - however, no idea what to go for.

    i do understand 2 camera's are better than 1 - not sure budgets will allow - however, any recommendations you can give would be great - i will be hiring the camera.

    Wedding is in a church - reception at a hotel. Typical lighting etc.

    With regards to ceremony and speeches, i was thinking a wireless mic (on groom at ceremony) and on table for speeches?

    many thanks for any help,
    Neil

  2. #2

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    Not gonna advise on any particular cameras as I don't know if you're familiar with any particular make. Most have their favourites - Sony, Panasonic or JVC.

    Whichever one you choose hire it well in advance and practise using all the controls you'll need on a wedding day. 2 cams would be best as well.

    You seem to be familiar with the sensible radio micing of ceremony and speeches which is the best option, but make sure you know the camera/inputs/menu inside out cause you won't have much time to fiddle on the day as it moves so fast.
    My opinions are just that . . . Mine. It's not personal, but is based on my emotional and professional reaction to requested critique. If you choose to ignore constructive comments, I'll just assume you're a vanity poster and not posting to improve your filming and editing skills.

    Ex A.P.V Videomaker of the year - Ex M.M. IOV Come join my EXclusive club

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    hi,

    that's a good advice ...learn the camera first i rented a camera and ask my buddy to shot for me and didnt give him time to learn the camera ... the mic was set to record the environment so all speeches and the toasts are very quite ..

  4. #4

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    Get the DSLRs. They are fab!
    www.didamedia.com

    Bespoke and Affordable Video Productions in London -

    | Corporate Video | Commercial | PR Events | Live Recording | Motion Graphics | Music Video | TV Productions

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIDAMEDIA View Post
    Get the DSLRs. They are fab!
    So do you shoot weddings with them all the time? DSLRs are NOT good for continuous shooting during the ceremony and you will need more lens choices to be able to shoot everything too. They are harder to use than a normal video camera if you are hoping for 'good' results. Audio is a nightmare so you have to record externally and then sync in post. If you are not used to doing this then it would be madness to try it first at a wedding.

    The biggest problem to renting a video camera is that you are unlikely to get 'enough' time to learn the camera inside out so that you can do things as a reflex reaction rather than having to think about it. If you have to pause to think then you probably missed the moment.

    Too many people end up shooting on auto focus, auto exposure, auto sound etc and it ends up looking like a home movie (which is really what it is!).

    Having one camera at a wedding means editing is both easier and harder. Easier because you only have to edit one camera's worth of stuff, but harder because if you want a professional looking video you have no alternate views to cut to while you move 'this' camera. You end up relying on B-Roll footage and most people simply don't take enough of it or understand the editing process enough to know what kind of B-Roll to take in the first place.

    So, in terms of recommending a good camera - I don't want to recommend one over another because so much depends on what you've used before and what you are going to be editing with. Add to that, what is your budget? You can get handycams a lot cheaper than (say) an EX1 but they won't produce the same stuff. Also, don't forget that if you rent a memory card based camcorder you need to buy (or rent) lots of memory cards too. In some ways a tape based system is better because it's cheaper to buy tapes. OTOH, once the camera goes back you have no way of ingesting the tapes!

    Good idea on the wireless mics. You really do need them. The problem comes at the reception because while the groom and bride's father are relatively close together (so you can share one mic) the Best Man is typically seated at the end of the top table and unless you intend to run up and move the mic between the speeches (which never looks good) you are going to need a second audio recorder for the best man (not forgetting you will also need to sync these in post).
    Last edited by David Partington; 09-08-2010 at 02:36 PM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Partington View Post

    Good idea on the wireless mics. You really do need them. The problem comes at the reception because while the groom and bride's father are relatively close together (so you can share one mic) the Best Man is typically seated at the end of the top table and unless you intend to run up and move the mic between the speeches (which never looks good) you are going to need a second audio recorder for the best man (not forgetting you will also need to sync these in post).
    Hi David,

    I am interested in one day filming wddings, but in the mean time I am looking to make a short film and a documentary. I was interested in what you said above about the groom and father of the bride being close together.

    I have just ordered a wireless mic, c. 350, and wondered if two people sat next together would record at the same sound level or if, as I suspected, the person actually wearing the mic would end up louder?

  7. #7

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    Place the mic on the table between them - it will do fine. You don't have to have the person wear it for it to pick them up. Most the time the other person is quiet / silent during the speech and you need to pick up some ambient during applause and laughter anyway.

    I often have two people sharing a mic in speeches and never seem to have a problem, and don't forget you can also adjust the sound levels in post.

    I have multiple wireless kits for when I need to have several speeches from different positions that can't be mic'd together.

    I also use a Zoom H4N and a couple of Shure SM58S mics on stands for speeches where appropriate. I put the Zoom in the middle (in front of the groom) and the two Shure mics plugged in to it via long XLR cables (Zoom recording in 4ch mode) and placed in front of the Best Man/Men and the Father if they are sat too far away from the groom. Don't forget that there can also be impromptu speeches from anyone anywhere in the audience.

    The nice thing about using wireless is that you can monitor (and if required adjust the volume) from the camera (don't forget your headphones!), whereas the Zoom solution gets what it gets and you don't know until you play it later.

  8. #8
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    Feb 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Partington View Post
    Place the mic on the table between them - it will do fine. You don't have to have the person wear it for it to pick them up. Most the time the other person is quiet / silent during the speech and you need to pick up some ambient during applause and laughter anyway.

    I often have two people sharing a mic in speeches and never seem to have a problem, and don't forget you can also adjust the sound levels in post.

    I have multiple wireless kits for when I need to have several speeches from different positions that can't be mic'd together.

    I also use a Zoom H4N and a couple of Shure SM58S mics on stands for speeches where appropriate. I put the Zoom in the middle (in front of the groom) and the two Shure mics plugged in to it via long XLR cables (Zoom recording in 4ch mode) and placed in front of the Best Man/Men and the Father if they are sat too far away from the groom. Don't forget that there can also be impromptu speeches from anyone anywhere in the audience.

    The nice thing about using wireless is that you can monitor (and if required adjust the volume) from the camera (don't forget your headphones!), whereas the Zoom solution gets what it gets and you don't know until you play it later.
    Thanks David. As soon as it is delivered, I will try that.

  9. Default

    Check out this tread for planting lav mic. You may find it helpful and it is quite amusing
    http://www.videoforums.co.uk/sound-r...mics-film.html

    wedding video wedding videos wedding video London

  10. #10

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    I have shot on quite a few rental cameras and settled on a Sony AX2000 (similiar to NX5) which I bought. I shot weddings on Sony Z1 and Z5 HDV cameras with a personal Canon HV20 as a second camera during ceremony and speeches. These were great cameras but the big downside for me was using tape - its one more thing to worry about, they run out and they are expensive. I didn't want to compromise so it was professional tapes and an 85 min tape was 20 each. I generally shot about 5 tapes per wedding and I wouldn't say this was just enough. One time the speeches went on for way longer than I anticipated meaning a tape ran out mid speech, luckily I was also recording on a Zoom H4n for back up audio as there was no room for a second camera and I managed to cover the gap seamlessly where I was swapping in a new tape. Anyway shooting to SD card is great, I have 2x 32Gb cards which can record non stop for 7 hours at the highest quality (which is higher than HDV) so thats no longer a problem. The batteries are great on the Sony's too, normally one of the highest capacity batteries almost does me a whole days shooting. I also changed my Canon HV20 for a Panasonic SD700 which shoots to SD card too. The downside to this format is the compression, its great when you're shooting but editing is hard work for almost any computer as the compression is really complex. I agree that getting to know your equipment is very important as operating it needs to be second nature when shooting live events like weddings. I think when you start out and are using equipment you are not really familiar with it is safe to assume you will make mistakes, you just need to cover yourself as much as you can like me recording back up audio when I was relying on one camera for the speeches. One time I was shooting in winter and when I went inside the church (cold into warmth) the lens steamed up and the ceremony kicked off as soon as I had planted the camera on the tripod, I was trying to wipe it but all I had was my tie, I was so stressed out trying to set up the camera through a lens that kept steaming up I forgot to press record and missed the first few minutes! Wedding are unpredictable and you have to deal with whatever happens. I think having your own equipment is so much better than renting for another reason other than getting to know it better although I know renting is necessary when getting started, you wouldn't spend 7000 on equipment for your first wedding. The last time I was due to rent a camera for a wedding 3 days before the wedding I got a call from Progressive Broadcast Hire based in Edinburgh, Scotland (yes I am naming and shaming those bastards for what they did to me) telling me a large client who had been renting the camera for a few weeks before me needed to keep it and extend their hire by another few weeks (more money than my one day hire) and that it was no longer available. They offered me an alternative camera but nothing they had was suitable - a Panasonic P2 camera with 2x 16Gb cards was not good enough, I wouldn't have been able to record long enough to capture all the ceremony or speeches, I would have been dumping the footage on to a laptop every 30 mins. Anyway there was no where else in Scotland that I could hire a camera at that late notice. I was about to have one shipped really fast from Surrey in the south of England but I bought one from Sony (I worked in a shop that had access to those cameras) it arrived on the Friday with me shooting on the Saturday. Man that was almost a near disaster considering my booking for that camera had been made about 9 months earlier as I like to be prepared. BTW I am full time shooting video now. Hope some of my ramblings provide some helpful information.

    Regards

    Adam Troup
    http://www.inspirevideo.co.uk

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