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Thread: Video Travelogues

  1. #1
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    Oct 2004
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    Default Video Travelogues

    Did I spell that right? Anyway, one of the main reasons for getting a decent camcorder was to make a video travelogue of my travels later in the year to China and Outer Mongolia. We have been before to both countries and recorded it thoroughly from behind a camera lens but this time I'll be seeing it from behind an LCD screen.

    Having been bored to death by friends 4 hour marathon efforts showing jerky footage of subjects that may only be interesting to them I'm keen to get as much advise as possible............

    My Mongolian friend keeps us glued to our seats and crying for more when he gives an impromptue slide show (Now that is spelled wrong!). What is it that gives a good travelogue that edge?

    Cheers

    H

    PS Quite a few of my photos on www.mongolia.co.uk
    Athlon XP2000, 750 mb, 2nd hard drive on order (200gb), Pinnacle DV500 DVD, Adobe Premier 6.5 and lots of other sofware that came with the Pinnacle board.

    Panasonic NV-GS400

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    Bracknell, Berkshire, UK
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    Default Re: Video Travelogues

    Quote Originally Posted by roadster
    Did I spell that right?
    It depends on which side of the Atlantic you live on
    No 'ue' if you are from North America but, as I see you are from jolly old blighty and speak "International English" (we can blame Adobe for this expression ) then your spelling is fine

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Video Travelogues

    Quote Originally Posted by roadster
    My Mongolian friend keeps us glued to our seats and crying for more when he gives an impromptue slide show (Now that is spelled wrong!). What is it that gives a good travelogue that edge?
    Camera technique, lighting, story telling, good editing, and appropriate dialogue. And perhaps humour.

    Essentially, all the things you need to consider when making a video. I've said it a million times (that's not true), and I'll say it again, "if you want other people to watch your videos, look at it from their perspective."

    Something's that funny to you and your mates, or even just those involved, probably won't be funny for the rest of the world. Concentrate on the basics, and people will sit back and watch. Look at nature programmes on TV - examine the way they frame shots, what the camera looks at and why.

    And be ruthless in editing. Add a commentrary in post production. Whatever you do, obey the laws of good shooting!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Ottawa ON Canada
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    12

    Default Shoot your buddy's face.

    Among zillion of advices you can get from forum participants, try this one: shoot your buddy's face, not the back.

    My friend got back from family vacation and brought long-long footage of his family walking around resort, beach, market place, etc. He let his family go ahead explore new places and shot that adventure from behind. My advice for him was to keep it shorter and shoot faces instead. He had just got back from another vacation. Guess what, it was totally different video.

    In your case it does not matter if you are at the Carribean resort or in Mongolian mountains. Make yourself and your buddy the stars of your documentary. While filming your friend go ahead, position yourself and tape whatever happens to him. Trade camera. Let him film you. Shoot surroundings. But keep your shots relatively short.

    My teacher told me: first thing you have to do, ask yourself, who is your audience. Shoot your video for a certain audience: either your mom or your school friends. Think of it while shooting.

    Andrei, http://faqvideo.com

    Put it this way. Each shot conveys the message

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    (Out in the wilds of) Leicestershire
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    Default

    Thanks for that simple but excellent advice. I am often accused of positioning people in shot and treating them as part of the scenery

    Cheers

    H
    Athlon XP2000, 750 mb, 2nd hard drive on order (200gb), Pinnacle DV500 DVD, Adobe Premier 6.5 and lots of other sofware that came with the Pinnacle board.

    Panasonic NV-GS400

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