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Thread: Video Production setup (Help!)

  1. #1

    Default Video Production setup (Help!)

    Hi everyone!

    Our office is planning to setup our own tv show for employees. I have been tasked to organize the team and scout for equipment I need considering our requirements.

    This is what we wanted to have in the production:

    1. Talk show. 2 Camcorders.
    2. Interviews. 2 camcorders or 1 camcorder on te interviewer while the interviewee is on video conference.

    My predicament:

    How do I do video recording with 2 cameras switching from one cam to another?
    Does this necessarily mean I need a video mixer and switches (CCUs) on this?
    How is the recording done using a PC?
    Any specific PCI video card I can use?
    What basic equipment do i need?

  2. #2
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    If this is not for live broadcast (you mention video recording) then it's a doddle.
    Record with both cameras
    Capture or copy the recordings into just about any video package on a PC.
    Drop your recordings onto separate tracks.
    Use the sound track to sync them up. NOTE: Ensure you have a few shor sharp sounds (eg clap of hands) when recording to ensure you have a good "spike" to line up.
    Edit away!

    EDIT:
    Some further thoughts on the "2 camera approach". Watch TV shows. Ensure you always start with a wide or a "two shot" (showing both interviewer and interviewee) and come back to that shot from time to time. Without this the viewer has no idea how the characters relate to each other - they can't tell the significance of where each is looking, how they move their bodies etc.
    Even if one person is on a video link - show the other looking at a PC screen or something to make this obvious.
    Last edited by TimStannard; 06-11-2009 at 01:58 PM.
    Tim

  3. #3

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    Often, they do interviews with just one cam.

    They'll do the whole interview with the cam on the interviewee. Gentle zooms in on the interviewee as they get to the meat of their answer are particularly effective. Then thank them and let them go on their way.

    Then they'll film the interviewer asking the questions afterwards. (It does rely on you having the questions scripted!)

    They also often film reaction shots as cut-aways, to cut in during the interviewees response, you know, the interviewer nodding in agreement, or looking interested as he/she listens to the response.

    Then it's just a case of cutting it all together in your edit, and ta-da!

  4. #4
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    Our old friend the 'Noddy' is making a welcome return. Lots of nooding heads from the interviewer in response to the reply from the interviewee, even though they are long gone. So a bit of acting comes into play. Also get the interviewee talking to the interviewer in long shot before the actual interview starts as you need to cut out a lot of waffle in interviews. OTS or over the shoulder shots are essential and so is the intro piece where the person being interviewed walks through the scene and past the camera.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by TimStannard View Post
    Capture or copy the recordings into just about any video package on a PC.
    Drop your recordings onto separate tracks.
    Use the sound track to sync them up. NOTE: Ensure you have a few shor sharp sounds (eg clap of hands) when recording to ensure you have a good "spike" to line up.
    I'm very much new to filmmaking and video editing -- sorry if any questions are dumb.

    1) Is this usually the way that multi-camera shows/shots are edited, i.e. using the soundtrack as a reference point?

    2) If you want to cut some of the footage, what is a way to transition the sound so that it doesn't sound like any is missing?

    3) In a single-camera set-up, like for a movie, how do they have a continuous soundtrack? Do they always dub it over the already-edited footage?

    Thanks for any help.

  6. #6
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    A clapper board snapping shut or timecodes.

    If you want to lose some of the interview and compress time, and this is done all the time as people tend to ramble on a bit, you have to leave gaps of silence in the interviewing. That's why the interviewer must stay quiet during the interviewee's answwers. As much as you are tempted to interject, say um or ah or anything else, you have to stay quiet if you are asking the questions.

    It's not a continious soundtrack, it has been edited so well it sounds like it is continious but large chunks of it have been removed. An interview that may have taken 20 minutes to film in real time, is too long for tv news when they only have 10's of seconds to give to each item. The gaps are also covered with cutaways, cut ins, over the shoulder wide shots where you can't see the face of the person talking and therefore you don't have to worry about lip synching and the interviewer doing a voice over, all classic techniques used in tv news.

    When you ask a question, you only require 1 or 2 sentences from the interviewee that give the actual answer, the rest is not needed so lose it.
    Last edited by Nikosony; 06-17-2009 at 05:53 PM.

  7. #7

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    Thanks, dude.

    What about when it's not a TV interview or the like? When it's a cinema film, and lip syncing is a priority and sound effects and ambiance has to be complete, how do they deal with cuts and splices? Is it always an audio dub over the final video product?

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    Soundtracks are re-recorded again in both an ADR studio and a Foley studio, look them up in Google. The original soundtrack is only used as reference material.

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