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Thread: Rough cut of pre-ceremony montage

  1. #1

    Default Rough cut of pre-ceremony montage

    Hi folks,

    Since you guys were so helpful looking at my last montage I wondered if anyone would like to take a peek at my rough cut of my pre-ceremony montage thingy for my current project.

    The song choice (one of Madonnas) was the brides, and while initially I was horrified I think it works pretty well in context.

    Theres one or two things I'm not happy with, I think the part at the start whizzes past too quick, and the later stuff inside the venue looks a bit too brown, although I was working with some seriously dark footage and I dont think I've color corrected it particularly well. I also need to mix in the music from the ceremony, but after spending hours and hours on the thing I need to step back and be objective. I do like the shot of the groom looking thoughtful.

    Why my Premiere isnt exporting in 16:9 is anyones guess, so it will look a bit squished. Anyway, lemme know your thoughts! Thanks!



    Last edited by EternalImages; 04-21-2009 at 09:59 AM.

  2. #2
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    For me - this is horrid, sorry.

    First off - why the vignetting? It's a way over used effect that adds nothing in my opinion. Second - you REALLY need to buy a tripod or steadicam - alot of the shots are shakey to the extent that it looks like my old Uncle Albert filmed them. Third - bad framing throughout - worst exampls are the little girl and cutting off the bridesmaids head when she exits the car. If your going to focus on the flowers, get in real close, dont leave the poor girl headless! Fourth - jumpy cuts - alot of edits have little or no fluidity. Fifth - as interested in shoes as a viewer may be, the light ray effect is there for what reason? Sixth - the walking up the aisle shot is dreadful - the effects just dont work at all.

    Best bit is the music.

    If you've charged anything at all for this, and I mean even one penny - give them a refund. I'd be demanding one if I were the customer.

    And if you think my critique is harsh - remember - anyone paying for video work deserves a quality effort. This falls a long way short of that and demonstrates why pro wedding vidders charge what they do. And why they're worth it.

  3. #3
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    As Andy suggests, you need to spend more time developing your craft before you can start to charge. Videography (particularly event videography) requires a combination of the skills of an artisan and the knowledge of a techie. You may stray towards one of the two, but without being highly skilled in either, you'll struggle to compete with industry professionals.

    The video montage suggests that you've attempted to compensate for below par filming / limited creativity by including special effects. Editing and post production can be kept simple by well executed camerawork and well timed edits. Everything else is just decoration. Watch you video without sound. And then look past the visual eye candy.

    I suggest you practice, practice, practice. Take you camera everywhere you go if you don't feel comfortable with it. Experiment in your own time and at your own expense to develop your camerawork and editing technique.

  4. #4
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    I am so sorry to do this to a budding pro but...

    I have to agree with Andy. Some of the framing was catastrophic. Heads cut off are inexusable. If you want to show the flowers, go in for a close up, bodies with cut-off heads (and it happened a lot) are examples of really poor camerawork.

    I quite liked the multi-screen at the beginning but what's with the sudden switch from colour to monochrome shots and then back again? The vignetting and fade to black was also a bit overdone in my opinion.

    Even on a trailer you have to think of continuity. The car shot especially where we see a posh saloon car drive in and then cut to the bridesmaids getting out of a people-carrier.

    What was the music? Far too dramatic for this montage. It was cut to the beat but not sympathetically. It's not enough to change the shot at the start of each "line" it has to be done with feeling. Something which I can't explain in a few lines. Read "In the blink of an eye" by Walter Murch.

    Finally, buy a bloody tripod, monopod or steadycam-type accessory. That shakey footage is not acceptable.

    I really hate to be so negative especially as your previous stuff showed a lot of promise. This however, doesn't hit the spot. If you're going to charge people for your services you have to be professional. As a mate's video it's nice, as a professional job it's awful.

  5. #5

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    *cries in the corner*

    Thanks for your honest feedback guys.

    This is only my second wedding (again, a freebie but hoping to build up a back catalogue of decent work to charge in the future) and have already learned a great deal from some pretty catastrophic mistakes and dumb-assery on my part.

    A great deal of this montage is made up of B-roll footage that my wife shot handheld (can you tell? :-P) and although she tries hard shes no professional cameraman by any stretch of the imagination, and neither am I, although I have had much more experience with cameras.

    I guess my problem is that I'm more interested in moments, so I tend to include material that may be horrendously shaky or badly framed to include moments that I think are nice.

    The vignetting and added effects are, as you say, to try to mask some pretty ropey source footage.

    I guess what I need to do is only include shots that are extremley high quality,framed correctly etc and be much more harsh when it comes to throwing out unacceptable footage, just because it has a nice smile or facial expression in it. Unfortunatly that rules out about 90% of my B-roll stuff.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by EternalImages View Post
    *cries in the corner*.
    Good to see you can take it on the chin.... Many can't
    Quote Originally Posted by EternalImages View Post
    ..I guess what I need to do is only include shots that are extremley high quality, framed correctly etc and be much more harsh when it comes to throwing out unacceptable footage...
    You're absolutely spot on here. A paying customer will demand the best - especially if they're shelling out a couple of grand for a decent job.

    As you're shooting, constantly ask yourself - is this a shot you would want on your own wedding dvd... And as difficult as it is with wives, train her to use a decent tripod, and stick to wide shots. Like that she'll be steady and probably unable to chop people in half...

    Good luck with the next.

    Final thought - why not join the IOV or something similar? I'm not a member, but I would hope they encourage aspiring wedding vidders with help and advice...

  7. #7
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    'I guess what I need to do is only include shots that are extremley high quality,framed correctly etc and be much more harsh when it comes to throwing out unacceptable footage.' - That's the only video you want to show to the public, the rest stays firmly on the cutting room floor, never to see the light of day. As a B Roll it is useless, the person who shot it needs to learn how to frame shots correctly before hitting the record button, know how to keep the camera upright and don't let it jump about all over the place. Hold the camera steady and let the action take place within the frame and then let it exit. Only move the camera if you have to, otherwise don't move it at all. Too many effects, too many transitions, it shows up how badly the video was shot the more of these 'sticking plasters' that are used. Again to repeat what was said above you need a tripod each or a tripod and hire a steady cam for the day.

  8. #8

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    In thee old days before forums we had to find our own way of trying to become perfect at the stuff (still ongoing I may add)

    I used to watch a lot of TV and try and see why shots were used and why they did what they did, from that I learned about framing, narrative cutaways etc. In the edit room you have to be ruthless, the old arrr that's nice, I know but does it say anything to me?, or its badly framed then in the bin it goes.

    Also its not just the pictures the sound is just as crucial, watch TV with your eyes shut and see if you can guess what is happening, now try with no sound and see if Jas is just as scary.

  9. #9
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    The edit felt busy and rushed. All technical onanism and little thought or sensible design.

    I sometimes think editors whould come with ZERO fx with the fx costing more - most inexpirienced editors us fx far to randomly and heavily.

    This is a wedding video - not that bit out of contact where the ladt goes thru the wormhole. Fx should be used with intelligence, consideration and a light touch ( stress ).

    Gentle use of fx will add to the persuasiveness of the contant, overuse - as here - diminishes the content.

    To be blunt - it was very poor and NOT work that is worthy of payment.

    L E S S I S M O R E
    &
    G E T I T R I G H T I N C A M E R A - a well composed well shot shot will not need all that weird LSD trip stuff to persuade.

  10. #10
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    A bit more...

    Think about what you are saying to your audience when you use an effect. Why are you using it?? What came befor and after - what is the ' sentence ' you are weaving saying??

    For example -

    B/W or seopia often means ' times past' or ' ages ago'
    Changes in colour balance may mean ' this is another place or mood'
    Vingnetting means ' memories / old times / top gear episode ( usually colour not black ) - black sky just looks like the end of the world is nigh however - not good for a wedding really is it.
    Radial blur / light rays - just avoid for everyithng except pop videos and sci fi
    Multiscreen - totally avoid unless you are assertive and clear with its use. Best to split screen properly rather than use the c cutter just to plonk over the top with nasty blurry edges. It needs clear boundaries with each shot having a clear black boundary imho.

    Oh - and the first shot - half completed reveal from an industrial building - vile I think.

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