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Thread: Returning after 3 years

  1. #1

    Default Returning after 3 years

    Hi all,

    I used to have a few cheap mini dv camcorders. My last one was a canon MV700i (it broke in the end)

    I would now like to buy a new camcorder and like the idea of the new hard disk camcorders

    I can not work out whether mini dv would be somewhere near the quality of a standard def hard disk recorder or a high def hard disk recorder??

    In other words I would like to spend the least amount of money to replace my old camcorder. If a 300 one would be as good as my old machine, i don't want to spend 800.

    I should say I use these camcorders for family holidays etc, I am not trying to reshoot jurassic park, a consumer grade machine will be fine.

    However i intend to play the videos on a 50 inch plasma, not utube so the resolution and quality has to be at least reasonable...

    All advice gratefully received, any ideas on any bargain makes at the moment would be greatly appreciated.

    Oh one last thing, i used to use ulead video studio 9. it seems corel have bought ulead and it is now called video studio X2 pro deluxe orgasmic plus or something similar. I would like to use a camcorder that would be compatible with video studio X2 as i like it and can get a cheap upgrade from my old videostudio 9.

    Thanks

    Andy

  2. #2
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    Default

    It isnt clear to me what you want.

    What is clear to me is that hard drive cameras are weird - they produce very compressed video that needs a heap of cores to edit.

    If you want ' high def ' go for a tape based camera - slightly better video, much better to edit.

    If you want SD just get another dv cam.

  3. #3

    Default

    Mark,

    Thankyou very much for the reply, i apologise if i did not make myself clear, this is probably because i am a little unsure what i want myself

    I have a broken mini dv camcorder which i was very happy with before it broke!

    Now that i look at replacing it i find that technology has moved on and the shops make it look as though mini dv is DEAD you need a new funky hard disk camcorder.

    What i was trying to ask as such is, are the new hard disk camcorders great, the replacement to mini dv, which is virtually dead, OR is it all just a big scam and a cheap mini dv camcorder will basically give me a better camcorder for less money.

    Or put another way are the hard disk camcorders BETTER than mini dv or are they just more suitable for the mass market who don't know how to use video editing software?

    If the former case then i will get a hard disk camcorder
    if the latter case then i will get another mini dv as I am quite happy using video studio editing software, or pinnacle or imovie.

    Another scare along the same lines. I have all my existing recordings stored on mini dv, i edit them and then reexport them to a dv-in enabled camcorder and store them on tape rather than compressed dvd. I was concerned that if minidv died out i would have all my recordings on a medium that i could not actually play back any more, so i was going to get a terrabyte hard drive and store them all on there as avi files. is that a good idea or a stupid idea.

    I hope my rather lengthy reply helps you understand what i am trying to achieve

    Thanks very much again for replying

    Andy

  4. #4
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    Default

    To give another side to Mark's opinion, I love the flexibility provided by solid state camcorders. The transition from the ease of DV editing is troublesome at first, but once you find a workflow that works for you, you'll love the advantages.

    The bottom line is that software companies are playing catch up with the technology. At the moment, I convert AVCHD to HDV or DV and edit in these formats. The conversion time is still quicker than DV transfer, and you don't have the hassles associated with tape based formats.

    On balance, i prefer AVCHD in hard drive based camcorders to DV on tape based cameras. Yes, there are issues with editing, but they can be overcome and the advantages of solid state media are greater.

  5. #5
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    Advatages of solid state / hard rive - you dont have to wait to capture - isnt that it? But considoring you have to watch your video befor you edit I dont see the advantage really.

    And whilst it may be possible to edit avchd natively you really dont want to start using colur correction or shrpening or much in the way of fx at all, or too many tracks - or render times will be epochal ( that a word ? ).

    AVCHD offers the advantages of most well thought out capitalist shills - profit - but not for you.

    It beggers belif why solid state and h drive cams dont use the more sensible and better HDV codec.

    What is the point of a camera that produces data so complex that it is barely editable beyond simple cutting?

    The avchd cam I had for a bit did my head in when editing - I commonly have 10 fx on a track and over 20 tracks of video - it aint for me.

  6. #6

    Default

    Marc and Mark,

    Thanks for the replies, seems like you are taking largely opposite views.

    I have no problem with mini dv tape, my only real concern is whether it is going to become obsolete. Personally i suspect it is...

    Is this AVCHD becoming a standard? I did notice on the page for videostudio X2 that it supported this format. Would that make the editing any easier??

    Ta

    Andy

  7. #7
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    AVCHD is indeed a standard format. And with time, all latest iterations of software will natively support the format. As Mark points out, it is a more compressed format than DV or HDV, and therefore doesn't lend itself well to editing. However, the codec produces far improved compression ratios for a given quality, which is why it was chosen; the format lends itself well to maximing space on SD cards.

    The beauty of the format for me is that I can take a camera that fits into my pocket, and a few spare SD cards in my wallet. Up until a few years ago, I would have had to have taken a bag to film to achieve the same level of quality.

    The trick to editing AVCHD is... don't. I transcode to HDV or DV to edit. It works for me.

  8. #8

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    Marc,

    So let's say i bought a little camcorder with either cards or hard disc that supported AVCHD. Then i want to edit it in videostudio. Would i be able to "transcode" in videostudio or would i need another piece of software?

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