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Thread: Hello everyone, newbie question

  1. #1
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    Default Hello everyone, newbie question

    I'm looking to upgrade my pc soon (see spec in profile)

    At the moment i'm toying about with vegas 8, learning the ropes etc, i'm starting to get comfortable with titles, transitions, keyframing, panning cropping etc. and i've just bought a £250 hdd jvc everio camcorder to practice filming with.

    What i'm looking for advice on is buying a new pc that's going to be future proof for editing in HD, i have a five year plan, in 5 years i want to be able to shoot, edit & produce a finished product in HD

    I know a lot of you seasoned pro's must have heard this question a million times, so i'll ask it again '0)

    What is the minimum spec you'd recommend for hd editing?

    Although i don't need it at the moment because i'm still a novice, i'm thinking i may as well get a high end pc now because A: it will be a big improvement over what i have now and B: it will improve render times, playback etc. as i'm starting to have trouble playing back things in vegas when i use multiple files, fx, transitions etc. the only way round it is to preview in draught mode so maybe the time is right for me to upgrade?

    I wouldn't fancy building one myself, so i'll probably be looking for a plug in and go type

    My budget is whatever it takes (within reason)

    So, the question is, what MINIMUM spec should i be looking at?

    I want something that will handle anything i throw at it now, (multiple power hungry effects etc.) and when i'm ready i'll be able to upgrade in the future

    Thanks chaps, i'll definitely be hanging round here for some time as it's an excellent site for a novice like myself to learn from

    Look forward to speaking to you all

    Darren

  2. #2
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    A 5 year plan for a PC is far too long in my opinion. The latest and greatest PC today is tommorow's also ran in the world of PCs. Editing footage firom a JVC everio is also going to be a challenge no matter what PC you buy now: the AVCHD codec used is a bugger to edit even on the most powerful machines.

    I would suggest that you concentrate on defining a workflow for editing footage from your camcorder. Your money would be better invested in software that eases the process of editing AVCHD than hardware. Or invest in video editing related hardware such as those offered by Black Magic to deliver HD editing solutions.

    Put simply, editing AVCHD (which looks set to be the delivery format of choice for consumer cameras and semi-pro units a like) is currently something which is best done through converting this footage. I would invest your pennies in a) a new quad core PC and b) tools that can edit AVCHD. That's as best you'll get to future proof.

  3. #3
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    To make good films you dont need a top of the line PC or a top of the line camera.

    You need skill and that you learn by doing, studying, reading, watching films, listening to drectors commentries, listening to feedback, repeat.

    Read books - editing and filmmaking is so dam hard cos it's 50% technical learning ang 50% artistic skill. You cant make good stuff unless you learn the ' language of cinema ' .

    Dont mistake tube hits for 'good' either - well made stuff rarely does well unless it is you tube daft.

    Find a friend (s) to make films with, a group as enthusiastic as you - that is very cathartic.

    Your camera is not the best for editing. HD cameras are pushed by sales staff for some reason. Hdrive cameras produce video in a format called AVCHD and shops seem to be saying it is better than tape based HDV - it isnt - it's worse.

    Specifically the video it produces is slow to edit / render as it is very compressed - more than HDV - usuing a very complicated algorithm.

    If you can swap for tape based HDV. Sorry if that is distressing but those is the facts.

    It can take 5 years just to find a workflow and apps that work well with AVCHD cameras.....

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    I have a workflow for editing AVCHD, which is essentially to convert to HDV. It works, and you get the benefits of solid state recording and the ease of editing HDV.

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    Personally I think hthe ' benefits ' of recording to hard drives are fibs.

    It seems madness to put something as sensitive to movement and damage in a small portanble device.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark W View Post
    It seems madness to put something as sensitive to movement and damage in a small portanble device.
    Duuuuuuuuuude, you're talking about a harddrive in yesterday's sense of the word. I don't know of any cameras that have spinning harddrives. I'm talking about flash media. Tapes are a thing of the past. Yesterday's technology for yesterday's solutions. Flash based media gives high data rates and oodles of space at a cheap cost.

    Imagine having an iPod with a tape based storage mechanism. Madness I tell you. And that's exactly what DV cameras do. It's yesterdays solution for yesterdays problem - the falling price and increasing capacity of flash based media means today's solution is harddrive cameras, not tape based ones.

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    Indded - specifically I mean HD - hard drive - cameras.

    As for card - tis the future but the future isnt now.

    Card codecs are just normal cam coedecs on pro gear but on consumer cameras the codecs are still weird. It will be sorted soon as shown by many rposumer cams.

    Tape is still the best for most people.

    I still fail to understand why tape is soo bad - but the added security and reliablilty of card is clearly an advnatage.

  8. #8
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    The market is being led by naive consumers and ill informed marketing. As a result, it's become the video editing communities task to develop solutions. This is both through website communities and small software companies. It's not ideal, but it's pretty much how consumer video editing has always worked. The recording medium is produced, and then the editing process is developed around that medium. I remember trying to edit VHS footage when I was a kid. It wasn't pretty. Neither was the first time I edited DV.

    As I say, it's not ideal, but it's always been us as consumers and third parties to develop solutions. And it always will be. It's a pretty unique to the technology market. Can you imagine buying a film and then spending a day converting it into something you can watch? Not saying it's acceptable, but it will never change.

  9. #9
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    DV - easiier to capture - no looses - could be edited on contemporary PCs on release but a fast one needeed. Better all round than Hi 8.

    HDV - as easy to capture - no losses - better quality if you get decent camera - can be edited on any PC a few years old. Mostly better than DV.

    AVCHD - as easy or faster to capture - worse quality - needs a top of the range PC to edit - many apps wont touch it - AND NIETHER SHOULD YOU !

  10. #10
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    AVCHD is better quality than DV. It's a pain to edit raw, but not much worse than I experienced with DV when I first started editing all those years ago. There's work arounds to edit until technology catches up, and the quality is certainly better than DV given the equivalent optics. I wouldn't advise people not to use AVCHD, but I would advise they will need to research to edit.

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