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Thread: Films are saved in HUGE files. What do I do?!

  1. #1

    Unhappy Films are saved in HUGE files. What do I do?!

    I am trying to save a file that's 3-4 minutes long; it saved only 1/3 and it's already 700mb. I was saving in quick time format (is it .mov?), widescreen.

  2. #2

    Default

    I don't have the full version of this program (yet) but I should imagine there is a compression setting somewhere? Look for that. Then your file sizes will be reduced significantly. Sorry I'm not that much of a help.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Devon
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    99

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    frolovlad

    First of all dude we will need to know the following:

    1. What camera was used to film (Mini DVD, AVCHD, DVD so on)
    2. How did you get the footage from camera to the computer
    3. What software are you using for footage transfer (Avid, ADOBE, Win Media ect)
    4. What format did you record in, and what output settings do you have in your editor. i.e. filmed in 16-9 but output in Prem Pro in 5-4
    5. What editir are you using


    There are far too many variables to go through with regards to file sizes, but to be honest the bigger the file size the better the quality (8 out of 10 times). I try and caprture in the format i will deliver in.

    So my setup would be -

    1. Minidv XM1
    2. Firewire to computer
    3. ADOBE Prem Pro capture in timeline direct from camcorder
    4. 16-9 in both
    5. Prem Pro, After effects, Adobe Encore

    For me the bigger the file size the better.

    The fact that you say "I am trying to save a file that's 3-4 minutes long; it saved only 1/3 and it's already 700mb. I was saving in quick time format (is it .mov?), widescreen. " means very little, as you could be trying to save AVCHD in a huge 2200 * 1900 file (Thats massive by the way) which would give you an amazingly huge file size because of the amount of "Pixles" used to make up that dimension.

    I would suggest:

    Re-capture the footage from your camera into a propper editor, then when you are ready set your output properties to the "NEEDED" perameters.

    Remember that its the target audience and reason for exporting / rendering the project that is also key - If its going onto the web then use a smaller export setting, and if its for DVD then still output as a big file but when you put it into your DVD encoder it will re-compress it.

    Hope it helps.

    Mitch

  4. #4

    Default

    1. Casual photo camera 10mpx
    2. Just stick a memory card in....
    4. .mov and trying to save as .mov ... originally it was 4:3, trying to save widescreen 16:9 (which I don't get, either)...720 X 480 is the frame size .
    5. Adobe Premiere CS3 is the editor

    And yes, it's going to web (Vimeo; they take HD)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Devon
    Posts
    99

    Default

    Ok, so now we have a few more questions....


    1. Casual photo camera 10mpx With this:- Do you mean you have pictures that you have turned into a movie / slideshow, or do you mean that you recorded a video on the camera?
    The second thins is that the amount of pixles "10mpx" means absolutely bugger all - without good optics and a steady hand the pictures will still only be good enough for a normal "Print" picture, the best cameras in the world dont have a huge amount of pixles on the chip, but they do have very good lens, good user and even better filter and shutter.

    If you have recorded a video on the camera then this is most likely recorded in mpg format.
    If you have a pile of pictures that you have slung together to make a video then 700mb is small for 3-4 minutes of video so i wouldnt worry.

    I dont understand No 4 - You do get 16-9 in Adobe CS3 i use it all the time. but you cant "Capture" 4-3 as 16-9 unless the camera has a conversion board on it which i dont think hand held stills cameras have.

    I think you are either trying to output "Render out" a video of your still photos captured at the maximum resolution you can which is bad as TV's can only see a set amount of pixles even if it is a HD TV. Or you are trying to output an "mpg" movie captured on your camera as something which it needs to render again - i.e. you have got an mpg movie on the cameras memory stick and you have output it as 720p extra large .mov file.

    I have just done a quick test, and one picture of mine shot on a Canon EOS at 1280 / 1024 pixles set in a 3 minute video but with the Ken burns effect on it (Moves about a small bity) came out at 1.1gb. So basically look at what your rendering and output the finished file as you need. i.e. "Web" dimensions and fps.

    Sorry i cant help you any more matey. Let us know if you solve it.

    Mitch

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