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Thread: Retail or OEM??

  1. #1
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    Default Retail or OEM??

    Im going to buy Adobe Premier Elements 3.0, and Adobe Photoshop Elements 5.0. The OEM version (Manual on CD in PDF) is running around $35-40 each, and the retail of each is running $50-70. I have been playing with the demos of each of these for a couple weeks now, is there any benefit to buying retail? Is there material I would like to have in the retail version or will I see all the same info (just digital) in the OEM version?

  2. #2
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    Most of my stuff comes oem from a mate who's in the business, and to my knowledge the only difference is the lack of packaging and all the pretty adverts and promotions they stuff in the retail boxes.

    The point of oem is a lower price so pc manufacturers and builders can offer the software with a new pc and still make a bit, both the software and hardware should be the same.
    Canon, Edius, Final Cut Studio, Always Progressive, Promotional Video Production

  3. #3
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    Just be wary of the licensing issues.

    A lot of OEM software is licensed only for distribution with a new PC or other peripherals/hardware. Retailers who supply in breach of this are being a bit naughty. They are effectively gaining a bit of an unfair advantage over their law-abiding competitors. I wont make a judgement about those purchasers that make such purchasing decisions - it's up to them at the end of the day.

    It follows that users may also be using the said software in breach of the developer's licensing conditions, and whilst the developer will very likely never find out, this could impact upon the user's entitlement to free support or upgrades.

  4. #4
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    That is true it is a bit of a grey area.
    The truth is that pc builders are building many machines a year so are entitled to sell oem products, and I can't see adobe worrying about selling another copy of the software, however it is done.

    There could be an issue for software that is branded for a company like dell or acer you may need to register with them to gain upgrades or included software might only load on a PC made by them, but I think you will be safe with a straight unbranded oem copy.

    Mike.
    Canon, Edius, Final Cut Studio, Always Progressive, Promotional Video Production

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by miwhel View Post
    That is true it is a bit of a grey area.
    The truth is that pc builders are building many machines a year so are entitled to sell oem products, .
    I ain't the type to fall out with the regulars here, especially the better ones (so don't be offended by my bluntness), but thats a wee bit of tosh, Mike.

    Being a PC builder does not entitle you to retail OEM software as a standalone item. Period. It entitles you to distribute software along the lines set down by the software developers licensing conditions.

    Adobe - Anti-Piracy Initiative : Piracy FAQ

    As to the question of whether Adobe care or not, well, I think they probably do - if only due to the loss of profit. OEM versions are heavily discounted. Every unlawful distribution of an OEM version costs Adobe the sale of a full price version.

    Don't get me wrong. I don't weep in my bed at night for Adobe. But I do feel a bit for those retailers that try to carve out an honest living selling software (or anything else, for that matter), only to be undercut by some unscrupulous, law-dodging little gob-shite that thinks that laws are there for sport (I'm thinking specifically of eBay pirates, as opposed to PC builders, by the way).

    That's what I think anyway.

  6. #6
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    Thumbs up No Sweat Bert6280

    Ah now that's a different thing entirely. Piracy websites, ebay the junk mail that comes round offering oem,are a bad thing and very much frowned upon by software developers I'm sure.

    The oem they sell could be either stolen/pirated but definately sold outside of the agreement.(I have never used them and never will)

    I buy about 15 machines a year and if I don't buy the software with them it has never been a problem to get it afterwards, yet there are other places I use occasionally that do stipulate that I buy hardware as well, but this is only a hard drive, motherboard or something so I only use them if other parts are required that aren't carried by my usual supplier.(I am talking over the counter not internet here)

    Everything of course has to be water tight legally on the adobe website as everywhere else.
    Adobe have a huge legal department, (I would think) so it is up to them to stamp on it.

    There's a difference between bending the rules and down right illegal, but you can't blame people for trying to find a bargain, it's 1 of the few perks left that helps to keep people happy from day to day. People will always buy on price rather than quality. It is the English desease. Have you got a cheaper 1? Never, Have you got a better 1?
    Canon, Edius, Final Cut Studio, Always Progressive, Promotional Video Production

  7. #7
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    Another point that was brought to my attention is the level of support and upgrading may be restricted with the OEM as compared to the retail. It seems that the extra $20 per kit might be worth it just for the peace of mind.

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    I've been reading this thread with interest and have to confess that I've thought of the difference one way or the other.

    I now look back and ponder at the fact that DABS.com sold me my first HDD I ever bought to expand my system. It was an OEM drive. At the time I simply took this to mean it had no manual and no colourfull 'consumer' box. i.e. no frills and saves few quid.

    After reading this thread I wonder at the legality of them selling it to me as a consumer upgrading his PC.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mo_money View Post
    Another point that was brought to my attention is the level of support and upgrading may be restricted with the OEM as compared to the retail. It seems that the extra $20 per kit might be worth it just for the peace of mind.
    This is definately an issue. The main reason for oem products being cheaper is that the support comes from the supplier and not the manufacturer, so in theory if Alan's HDD breaks he must go to dabs and not maxtor, if my memory card fails then I must go to the shop and not kingston, the same maybe the case with this software, it is with anything microsoft.
    Canon, Edius, Final Cut Studio, Always Progressive, Promotional Video Production

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