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Thread: Sony HC-series controlling lighting?

  1. #1

    Default Sony HC-series controlling lighting?

    I'm a beginner when it comes to cameras, just got a Sony HC-7 as my first camera.
    My first issue is I can't keep the light levels constant. I set up my lighting (halogen worklamps around the dark room) place my camera on a tri-pod and start recording.
    What I want to be able to do is splice footage from the 5 minute mark with footage from the 10 minute mark etc but when I go to splice it I notice the lighting levels have changed... its either gotten noticeably brighter or dimmer.
    In the time between, I have NOT moved any lights(or adjusted their settings) nor touched the camera. The only difference is the target has gotten slightly further away from the camera.

    So, is this some auto-feature that I should disable? As I've disabled a few things yet it still does it.

    Cheers

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Switch the camcorder over to manual control and set the manual exposure to give an even level of lighting in the room. As the insides of buildings are much darker than the light coming in from a window, you will have to turn the exposure up to let more light in, so when you pan past a window the scene outside will be burned out, or overexposed. I would also try to bounce lighting off the ceiling or walls if they are cream or white coloured rather than just shining the work lamps directly at whatever you are videoing. You could also try to use higher wattage bulbs in domestic house lights and place tham in dark corners to throw some light into them, I see this being done a lot of tv shows even during daytime scenes and no one seems pass any notice to it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Western Europe
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    Default

    Switch the camcorder over to manual control and set the manual exposure to give an even level of lighting in the room. As the insides of buildings are much darker than the light coming in from a window, you will have to turn the exposure up to let more light in, so when you pan past a window the scene outside will be burned out, or overexposed. I would also try to bounce lighting off the ceiling or walls if they are cream or white coloured rather than just shining the work lamps directly at whatever you are videoing. This will avoid deep and harsh shadows. You could also try to use higher wattage bulbs in domestic house lights, such as table lamps and place tham in dark corners to throw some light into them, I see this being done in a lot of tv shows even during daytime scenes and no one seems to pass any notice to it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    My apologies for the double post.

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